Why don´t send more workunit of S5GC1HF??

David
David
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Topic 195588

I would like to know what´s happening in the S5GC1HF series workunit...

Why not send more S5GC1HF workunits?

Now I'm getting BRP3SSE that this works are harder than S5GC1HF for my CPU.

I guess that BRP are for cuda instead of CPUs.

But what is the reason to stop S5GC1HF?

Is more probably that BRP3SSE found pulsars than S5GC1HF...

Greetings all for answers :)

Richard Haselgrove
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Why don´t send more workunit of S5GC1HF??

It's a test.

Read message 109572.

tolafoph
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Bernd wrote in an other

Bernd wrote in an other thread (http://einsteinathome.org/node/195551&nowrap=true#109572):

Quote:

Yes, when we started S5GC1HF there was no Radio-Pulsar search (ABP2 or BRP3) running (well, to be precise, the last tasks of ABP2 were shipped).

BRP3 was delayed by almost two months, and we're still experimenting with it. While we are ramping up the output, the computation spent on S5GC1HF decreases, and the estimated end of S5GC1HF pushes later.

Right now I'm trying to find the limits of the system, i.e. how much BRP3 work we can ship. I'm shifting the scheduling ratio between GW and RP work about twice a week towards BRP3. I know that we couldn't run the project with more that ~40% of ABP2 work. With the new setup and the new workunit generators of BRP3 some limitations have been removed, I'd like to see how far we could get in case we need to.

Then ultimately I'd like to settle for about 50/50 GW/RP search in normal operation.

BM

Edit: Damn, too late...

archae86
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RE: Now I'm getting BRP3SSE

Quote:
Now I'm getting BRP3SSE that this works are harder than S5GC1HF for my CPU.


The current flavor of GC HF is S5GCESSE2. You can edit the Einstein@home preferences reachable from your main account page to avoid pulsar work and to get the HF work when it is available, which is not always.

These are, I think, requests and not commands in the sense that the project can send what it wishes, but I think this particular preference is currently being honored, as I have it set for hosts which have not received new pulsar work in some days and have received hundreds of GC HF results in the same period.

Bernd Machenschalk
Bernd Machenschalk
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If you don't like to get BRP3

If you don't like to get BRP3 workunits, you can opt-out from the BRP3 application in your Einstein@Home preferences.

BM

BM

David
David
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For me it is indifferent, but

For me it is indifferent, but I was wondering if BRP is best for GPU as CPU...

And, if someone can you explain me the diferents of BRP between SGC5HF...

Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
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RE: For me it is

Quote:

For me it is indifferent, but I was wondering if BRP is best for GPU as CPU...

And, if someone can you explain me the diferents of BRP between SGC5HF...


Hi!

As for GPU: only one of the searches (BRP3) currently has GPU apps (for Windows and Linux). So S5GC1HF has only CPU tasks, while BRP3 has both, GPU and CPU tasks. If you want to give E@H work to your NVIDIA GPU (see GPU requirements in a separate thread in this forum), you should not disable BRP3 in your preferences.

S5GC1HF and BRP3 are separate experiments, crunching data from different sources to find different things:

BRP3: As input, this search takes data from a radio telescope, currently the Australian Parkes Observatory (the thing that was starring in the movie "The Dish", btw.). The ultimate goal is to find a radio pulsar that is in a very close orbit around another object). As a by-product, this search can also find previously unknown pulsars that are "single" or are in a wider orbit around some other object. There is a very nice description of the search here: http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/radiopulsar/html/index.php. It is slightly out of date, please replace "Arecibo" by "Parkes" in this text :-). If you are interested in the scientific details, you will like the coverage of the first discovery of this search http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/rapidpdf/science.1195253v1?ijkey=fUmYrDCDRI/K2&keytype=ref&siteid=sci. There's also coverage of this discovery that is easier to swallow, see http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/news.php.

S5GC1HF: This experiment is more ambitious (meaning that discoveries are expected to happen with a lower frequency, but if a discovery should happen it would be BIG, BIG news, forever engraving your name as a co-discoverer into the history books of physics ... kind of). The input data comes from two observatories called LIGO which are Gravitational Wave detectors. This is front line physics: no gravitational wave has ever been measured directly. S5GC1HF searches for a particular kind of gravitational waves in the LIGO data, and those waves are believed to be emitted by some pulsars (so both searches are about pulsars).

To learn more about LIGO, gravitational waves, General Relativity and all that, you can find lots of stuff if you follow the links on the home page of Einstein@Home.

Happy Crunching
HB

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