which linux version can i use for best,can somebody tell.

dutchie
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Topic 193265

hello,what can i do for best.

i want to step over,from windows to linux,

i use a 64 bit computer,and i now there are different
versions of linux,to use.
which one i can use, for best to run boinc and different projects,boinc related.
maby there is a version,who is better for an optimized client also,who can tell.

gr-rene-amsterdam.

Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
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which linux version can i use for best,can somebody tell.

Quote:

hello,what can i do for best.

i want to step over,from windows to linux,

i use a 64 bit computer,and i now there are different
versions of linux,to use.
which one i can use, for best to run boinc and different projects,boinc related.
maby there is a version,who is better for an optimized client also,who can tell.

gr-rene-amsterdam.


Hi!

There's been an informative discussion recently here on choosing a Linux distribution, following this message.

From a performance point of view, or support for 64 bit and multicore CPUs, you will hardly experience any visible difference on different Linux distros, soother things like user-friendliness, ease to update software etc will be more important to you. Many distros now offer Live-DVD versions where you can try-out the system by booting from a DVD, without installing anything. This can be instructive e.g. to try out different Desktops like KDE or Gnome.

CU

Bikeman

th3
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Debian-based installs are

Debian-based installs are best IMO, like Debian/Ubuntu/Kubuntu, the debian package system for software is excellent. Forget about 64bit, compatibility problems can be time consuming also for experienced users, and no problem to use 4GB or more RAM in 32bit. Simple things like getting Java to work in Firefox can grow to big projects on 64bit.

As bikeman said, try a Live-CD/DVD to see what you like most, Gnome or KDE. Download Ubuntu (gnome) and Kubuntu (KDE) and boot the livcecds, then you can also see how your hardware is supported. Personally i prefer original Debian and KDE, not so automated driver installs for some newer hardware, so Kubuntu 7.10 would be my recommendation. Dont worry about the not-so-great webbrowser in Kubuntu, just go to the commandline and type "sudo apt-get install firefox"

KSMarksPsych
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I cut my teeth on Ubuntu

I cut my teeth on Ubuntu 7.04. I've moved over to Fedora 7 with KDE. Fedora supported my hardware a bit better than Ubuntu (namely the weird widescreen laptop monitor). But I found both very user friendly. I've not yet looked at the latest Ubuntu release (I need to boot over to that partition and upgrade). But after using KDE extensively, I find Gnome less appealing. I'll probably end up wiping the Ubuntu partition and installing Kubuntu 7.10.

The Fedora forums were friendly and helpful when I had one (very stupid) problem. Someone had solved it for me within 30 minutes. And it wasn't even a Fedora issue. I was having issues with mplayer (it helps if you actually use the playlist flag when trying to play from a playlist).

Installing BOINC was fairly easy, but there are little quirks. Then again, I didn't use the package manager to do it either.

Kathryn :o)

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dutchie
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thanks everybody i know a lot

thanks everybody i know a lot more now,
i am a absolute beginner,so i think about the abunta version ,with a book is an option,or a packidge deal with support,from which you can choose, debian, ubuntu,kubuntu, i have to think about 64 bit software, because of my processor.
and there are a lott of new realeses,on the moment so,i will wait a little to see wat happens,and what is the best for me-

thanks anyway-- rene holland.

Annika
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Kathryn: 7.04 did have

Kathryn: 7.04 did have widescreen problems if you used the standard graphics drivers, but they are completely fixed in 7.10, at least it seems that way on my laptop (a 15.4" widescreen) and those of some other people I know.

KSMarksPsych
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RE: Kathryn: 7.04 did have

Message 74965 in response to message 74964

Quote:
Kathryn: 7.04 did have widescreen problems if you used the standard graphics drivers, but they are completely fixed in 7.10, at least it seems that way on my laptop (a 15.4" widescreen) and those of some other people I know.

Woot!

Thanks for the info. I'm a bit bummed that I have to work the next 3 Saturdays. I don't want to attempt an upgrade on a Sunday and then be all stressed if something goes wrong.

Any idea if an upgrade to 7.10 will destroy my ability to boot into Fedora (or Vista for that matter)? My initial install of Fedora broke my ability to boot into Ubuntu. I can post my grub.conf file if necessary. I know, at minimum, to preserve my sanity, I'll have to edit it to change 7.04 to read 7.10 on the bootloader screen. Something small like that will drive me nuts.

Kathryn :o)

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RandyC
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RE: Kathryn: 7.04 did have

Message 74966 in response to message 74964

Quote:
Kathryn: 7.04 did have widescreen problems if you used the standard graphics drivers, but they are completely fixed in 7.10, at least it seems that way on my laptop (a 15.4" widescreen) and those of some other people I know.

I'm just learning Linux... I did the upgrade from 7.04 to 7.10 last night and I am NOT happy with the screen drivers. It insists on displaying in 1152x768 resolution (which I believe is widescreen) when I need 1024x768 (standard). It doesn't even show an option for 1024x768. :-(

I wind up with the edges of my screen cut off (mouse will move into them, but I can't see what it's doing).

I looked for an alternate driver, but couldn't find one that looked close enough. Windows claims I'm using a Radeon 7000 graphics card, but Ubuntu doesn't list that as an option.

Seti Classic Final Total: 11446 WU.

ML1
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RE: ... looked for an

Message 74967 in response to message 74966

Quote:
... looked for an alternate driver, but couldn't find one that looked close enough. Windows claims I'm using a Radeon 7000 graphics card, but Ubuntu doesn't list that as an option.


Check out the Ubuntu forums.

Good luck,
Martin

See new freedom: Mageia Linux
Take a look for yourself: Linux Format
The Future is what We all make IT (GPLv3)

th3
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RandyC, you could start by

RandyC, you could start by checking the Section "Screen" in /etc/X11/xorg.conf - make sure it doesnt say "Virtual 1152x768", it it does, change that to 1024x768".
If not, you can try to add "1024x768" to the "modes" line under the same section. Im afraid you will find its already there and cant be choosen, then i dont know what to suggest, could be the HorizSync in Section "Monitor" or something..

You can use vi or nano to edit xorg.conf from the console, for ex "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf", make changes and then ctrl-X -> y -> Enter to save.

(edit, after changing xorg.conf, press ctrl-alt-backspace to restart X-server)

And before editing xorg.conf, back it up, type "sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.randy", then if you screw somthing up you can log in to the console or recovery mode and set it back with the command "sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.randy /etc/X11/xorg.conf" (can skip sudo if your logged in to recovery)

Unfortunately ATI is troublesome in Linux, the good news is that its about to change. AMD has gone open source for ATI drivers (Novel/suse is working on it), something that ATI has refused to do for all this years for some reason.

RandyC
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RE: RandyC, you could start

Message 74969 in response to message 74968

Quote:
RandyC, you could start by checking the Section "Screen" in /etc/X11/xorg.conf - make sure it doesnt say "Virtual 1152x768", it it does, change that to 1024x768".
If not, you can try to add "1024x768" to the "modes" line under the same section. Im afraid you will find its already there and cant be choosen, then i dont know what to suggest, could be the HorizSync in Section "Monitor" or something..

Thanks for the advice, I'll try it when I get off work.

Quote:
You can use vi or nano to edit xorg.conf from the console, for ex "sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf", make changes and then ctrl-X -> y -> Enter to save.


I've found that gedit from a console under su logon works fine. No need for vi or nano.

Quote:

(edit, after changing xorg.conf, press ctrl-alt-backspace to restart X-server)


Ubuntu works under gnome. Pardon my ignorance (only been playing with Linux for a week or so), so I don't know if that's the same as X-server or not. I'm considering doing a Kubuntu install (KDE) to see if I like how that works.

Quote:
And before editing xorg.conf, back it up, type "sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.randy", then if you screw somthing up you can log in to the console or recovery mode and set it back with the command "sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf.randy /etc/X11/xorg.conf" (can skip sudo if your logged in to recovery)


Backups are a necessity for me given my limited Linux experience. :^)

Quote:
Unfortunately ATI is troublesome in Linux, the good news is that its about to change. AMD has gone open source for ATI drivers (Novel/suse is working on it), something that ATI has refused to do for all this years for some reason.

Some light at the end of the tunnel?

Seti Classic Final Total: 11446 WU.

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