What can Intel P530 do for E@H?

alintope
alintope
Joined: 27 Jan 12
Posts: 52
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Topic 209943

Recently I bought a NVidia Geforce 1050 TI for my machine, so it can process gamma ray GPU work units now. On the mainboard the Xeon E3 1245's built in graphics processor (the driver is Intel P530) is not needed anymore for driving the monitor. I would turn it off in the BIOS. But perpaps there are work units it can process in parallel to the NVidia GPU?

Or does it make sense to leave monitor driving to the mainboard's graphic devices, thus the graphics card can concentrate on E@H computing?

Heinrich

mikey
mikey
Joined: 22 Jan 05
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alintope wrote:Recently I

alintope wrote:

Recently I bought a NVidia Geforce 1050 TI for my machine, so it can process gamma ray GPU work units now. On the mainboard the Xeon E3 1245's built in graphics processor (the driver is Intel P530) is not needed anymore for driving the monitor. I would turn it off in the BIOS. But perpaps there are work units it can process in parallel to the NVidia GPU?

Or does it make sense to leave monitor driving to the mainboard's graphic devices, thus the graphics card can concentrate on E@H computing?

Heinrich

The Intel P530 can't be used here at Einstein and therefore it's better to let the 1050Ti graphics card do your crunching for you. Using the Intel cpu built-in graphics chips was a good idea but in reality it made for alot of heat inside the pc's and can shorten the life of them if you run them too much. Seeing as how most stand alone graphics cards are upgradeable, as you did, it's often better to use them and then upgrade them as you can as opposed to trying to do too much with the built-in graphics on the cpu.

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