Strength of glass on the moon

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
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Topic 191788

Does anyone know:

What is the strength of glass on the moon?
How would Aerogel conpare to glass on the moon?

How can the two(Glass and Aerogel) strengthen a space station and where on the station can they be applied?

What in your opinions is the best material for
space station construction?

Simple minds want to know
Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless

tullio
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Strength of glass on the moon

Quote:


What in your opinions is the best material for
space station construction?

Simple minds want to know
Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless


Aluminium alloys. See Jules Verne.
Tullio

Kyle
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Wouldn't the strength of

Message 45046 in response to message 45045

Wouldn't the strength of glass be the same wherever it is? Now the moon has less gravity so if you built a gigantic building or something out of glass (not that I can see any purpose to that), you could make it bigger on the moon then earth without having it fall down under its own weight.

Joachim Schmidt
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RE: Wouldn't the strength

Message 45047 in response to message 45046

Quote:
Wouldn't the strength of glass be the same wherever it is? Now the moon has less gravity so if you built a gigantic building or something out of glass (not that I can see any purpose to that), you could make it bigger on the moon then earth without having it fall down under its own weight.

You're right with that, unfortunatly there's no atmosphere on the moon, so the glass has to be strong enough not to burst because of the pressure difference between inside and outside the building

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
Joined: 11 Jun 05
Posts: 57
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Wouldn't the strength of

Wouldn't the strength of glass be the same wherever it is? Now the moon has less gravity so if you built a gigantic building or something out of glass (not that I can see any purpose to that), you could make it bigger on the moon then earth without having it fall down under its own weight.

You're right with that, unfortunatly there's no atmosphere on the moon, so the glass has to be strong enough not to burst because of the pressure difference between inside and outside the building

Thanks guys, here's another question:

How would gravity (more or less) effect heat dispersion through fluid convection in glass on the moon?
Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
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RE: Thanks guys, here's

Message 45049 in response to message 45048

Quote:

Thanks guys, here's another question:

How would gravity (more or less) effect heat dispersion through fluid convection in glass on the moon?
Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless


Not a lot, I would guess? The convection is driven by a temperature gradient ( heat flowing from hotter to colder ), perhaps transients would be affected by gravity but the steady state not.
Anyway, what you want to do Ernie is not take glass to the moon, but make it there! I'm not sure what firing a few megajoules ( that you got from solar power ) through lunar dust does, but maybe it'll vitrify ( become glass-like ). :-)
Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
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RE: RE: Thanks guys,

Message 45050 in response to message 45049

Quote:
Quote:

Thanks guys, here's another question:

How would gravity (more or less) effect heat dispersion through fluid convection in glass on the moon?
Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless


Not a lot, I would guess? The convection is driven by a temperature gradient ( heat flowing from hotter to colder ), perhaps transients would be affected by gravity but the steady state not.
Anyway, what you want to do Ernie is not take glass to the moon, but make it there! I'm not sure what firing a few megajoules ( that you got from solar power ) through lunar dust does, but maybe it'll vitrify ( become glass-like ). :-)
Cheers, Mike.


Always an honor to learn from you sir.
Thanks Mike
Ernie

Chipper Q
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RE: Anyway, what you want

Quote:
Anyway, what you want to do Ernie is not take glass to the moon, but make it there! I'm not sure what firing a few megajoules ( that you got from solar power ) through lunar dust does, but maybe it'll vitrify ( become glass-like ). :-)


Spot on! NASA's having a contest (MoonROx, the Moon Regolith Oxygen competition) to see who can build a device to extract 5 Kg of breathable oxygen from lunar simulant in only 8 hours. One technique (pyrolysis) utilizes concentrated solar energy (sunlight focused with a lens) to heat the lunar simulant, and what's leftover is '"slag", a low-oxygen, highly metallic, often glassy material', and it would make a good raw material for 'bricks, pavement, or radiation shielding'.

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
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RE: RE: Anyway, what you

Message 45052 in response to message 45051

Quote:
Quote:
Anyway, what you want to do Ernie is not take glass to the moon, but make it there! I'm not sure what firing a few megajoules ( that you got from solar power ) through lunar dust does, but maybe it'll vitrify ( become glass-like ). :-)

Spot on! NASA's having a contest (MoonROx, the Moon Regolith Oxygen competition) to see who can build a device to extract 5 Kg of breathable oxygen from lunar simulant in only 8 hours. One technique (pyrolysis) utilizes concentrated solar energy (sunlight focused with a lens) to heat the lunar simulant, and what's leftover is '"slag", a low-oxygen, highly metallic, often glassy material', and it would make a good raw material for 'bricks, pavement, or radiation shielding'.

Right on Chipper Q
Thanks for the info amigo.
Ernie S

Lt. Cmdr. Daze
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RE: RE: Thanks guys,

Message 45053 in response to message 45049

Quote:
Quote:

Thanks guys, here's another question:

How would gravity (more or less) effect heat dispersion through fluid convection in glass on the moon?
Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless


Not a lot, I would guess? The convection is driven by a temperature gradient ( heat flowing from hotter to colder ), perhaps transients would be affected by gravity but the steady state not.
Anyway, what you want to do Ernie is not take glass to the moon, but make it there! I'm not sure what firing a few megajoules ( that you got from solar power ) through lunar dust does, but maybe it'll vitrify ( become glass-like ). :-)
Cheers, Mike.

The density of a gas or liquid depends on its temperature. Normally, a warmer gas becomes lighter. On Earth, this means that colder gas would drop down, because it's heavier. On the Moon, this would also occur, only at a smaller rate.

HTH,
BS

Somnio ergo sum

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