Questions from a new member

Donna
Donna
Joined: 21 Oct 05
Posts: 29
Credit: 8,600
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Topic 190090

Hello All:

My name is Donna, I'm new here and trying to absorb a great deal all at once!

I think Einstein@home is a brilliant concept and I hope for its continued success.

In the meantime, I have some questions that I hope some of you may be able to answer...

1)Is there enough data collected at this point to indicate, approximately, how many gravity waves are detected per day (an average)?

2a)How many of the detected gravity waves have a direct impact on earth? b)What if any disruptions do gravity waves cause, with respect to our planet? Example: studies have been done which seem to indicate that cosmic rays impact climate, volcanics and seismic activity...

3)Is there a system in place which assigns a designated measure, in terms of the size or force of these gravity waves, example: in gamma ray burst detection there are short bursts and long bursts and also there's a distinction in terms of brightness...

4)There is some evidence which suggests a relationship between cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts. There is also a theory that gravity waves could be connected to these other extra-terrestrial events as well... Example: On September 11, 2005, at the height of some record breaking solar activity (inluding a mega solar flare, followed by nine X-class flares and several M-class flares), the Moscow Neutron Monitor experienced a major downward spike indicating a significant cosmic ray event, at the same time, Sonoma's real time gamma ray monitor registered eight back to back gamma ray bursts (later reduced to one long burst with multiple peaks by NASA's SWIFT Project team)Obviously, there must be a connection between these events. I'm curious to know if there were any significant gravity waves detected at the same time (or before or after)...

5)Are gravity waves a source for radiation? If so, how would this be measured or are we not there yet?

If anyone can offer me some assistance in answering these questions, I would very much appreciate it!

Cheers-Donna

tullio
tullio
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 1,994
Credit: 31,794,462
RAC: 7,745

Questions from a new member

Quote:

Hello All:

My name is Donna, I'm new here and trying to absorb a great deal all at once!

I think Einstein@home is a brilliant concept and I hope for its continued success.

In the meantime, I have some questions that I hope some of you may be able to answer...

1)Is there enough data collected at this point to indicate, approximately, how many gravity waves are detected per day (an average)?

2a)How many of the detected gravity waves have a direct impact on earth? b)What if any disruptions do gravity waves cause, with respect to our planet? Example: studies have been done which seem to indicate that cosmic rays impact climate, volcanics and seismic activity...

3)Is there a system in place which assigns a designated measure, in terms of the size or force of these gravity waves, example: in gamma ray burst detection there are short bursts and long bursts and also there's a distinction in terms of brightness...

4)There is some evidence which suggests a relationship between cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts. There is also a theory that gravity waves could be connected to these other extra-terrestrial events as well... Example: On September 11, 2005, at the height of some record breaking solar activity (inluding a mega solar flare, followed by nine X-class flares and several M-class flares), the Moscow Neutron Monitor experienced a major downward spike indicating a significant cosmic ray event, at the same time, Sonoma's real time gamma ray monitor registered eight back to back gamma ray bursts (later reduced to one long burst with multiple peaks by NASA's SWIFT Project team)Obviously, there must be a connection between these events. I'm curious to know if there were any significant gravity waves detected at the same time (or before or after)...

5)Are gravity waves a source for radiation? If so, how would this be measured or are we not there yet?

If anyone can offer me some assistance in answering these questions, I would very much appreciate it!

Cheers-Donna

I think no gravitational wave has ever been detected with certainty although in the sixties Joseph Weber at the University of Maryland has published an article titled "Evidence for discovery of gravitational radiation".using very massive aluminium cylinders as detectors.The fact is that they are very weak and looking for them is close to looking for a needle in a haystack.
Tullio

Donna
Donna
Joined: 21 Oct 05
Posts: 29
Credit: 8,600
RAC: 0

RE: RE: Hello All: My

Message 18846 in response to message 18845

Quote:
Quote:

Hello All:

My name is Donna, I'm new here and trying to absorb a great deal all at once!

I think Einstein@home is a brilliant concept and I hope for its continued success.

In the meantime, I have some questions that I hope some of you may be able to answer...

1)Is there enough data collected at this point to indicate, approximately, how many gravity waves are detected per day (an average)?

2a)How many of the detected gravity waves have a direct impact on earth? b)What if any disruptions do gravity waves cause, with respect to our planet? Example: studies have been done which seem to indicate that cosmic rays impact climate, volcanics and seismic activity...

3)Is there a system in place which assigns a designated measure, in terms of the size or force of these gravity waves, example: in gamma ray burst detection there are short bursts and long bursts and also there's a distinction in terms of brightness...

4)There is some evidence which suggests a relationship between cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts. There is also a theory that gravity waves could be connected to these other extra-terrestrial events as well... Example: On September 11, 2005, at the height of some record breaking solar activity (inluding a mega solar flare, followed by nine X-class flares and several M-class flares), the Moscow Neutron Monitor experienced a major downward spike indicating a significant cosmic ray event, at the same time, Sonoma's real time gamma ray monitor registered eight back to back gamma ray bursts (later reduced to one long burst with multiple peaks by NASA's SWIFT Project team)Obviously, there must be a connection between these events. I'm curious to know if there were any significant gravity waves detected at the same time (or before or after)...

5)Are gravity waves a source for radiation? If so, how would this be measured or are we not there yet?

If anyone can offer me some assistance in answering these questions, I would very much appreciate it!

Cheers-Donna

I think no gravitational wave has ever been detected with certainty although in the sixties Joseph Weber at the University of Maryland has published an article titled "Evidence for discovery of gravitational radiation".using very massive aluminium cylinders as detectors.The fact is that they are very weak and looking for them is close to looking for a needle in a haystack.
Tullio

Hello Tullio:

Thank you very much for your informed reply...

So, I am Italian also, half anyway. My Italian side comes from Montella (my grandfather was Destefano), then I married/divorced a Sicilian and became a Volatile!

Anyway, nice to meet you Tullio and thank you again.

Kind regards-Donna

tullio
tullio
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 1,994
Credit: 31,794,462
RAC: 7,745

RE: RE: RE: Hello

Message 18847 in response to message 18846

Quote:
Quote:
Quote:

Hello All:

My name is Donna, I'm new here and trying to absorb a great deal all at once!

I think Einstein@home is a brilliant concept and I hope for its continued success.

In the meantime, I have some questions that I hope some of you may be able to answer...

1)Is there enough data collected at this point to indicate, approximately, how many gravity waves are detected per day (an average)?

2a)How many of the detected gravity waves have a direct impact on earth? b)What if any disruptions do gravity waves cause, with respect to our planet? Example: studies have been done which seem to indicate that cosmic rays impact climate, volcanics and seismic activity...

3)Is there a system in place which assigns a designated measure, in terms of the size or force of these gravity waves, example: in gamma ray burst detection there are short bursts and long bursts and also there's a distinction in terms of brightness...

4)There is some evidence which suggests a relationship between cosmic rays and gamma ray bursts. There is also a theory that gravity waves could be connected to these other extra-terrestrial events as well... Example: On September 11, 2005, at the height of some record breaking solar activity (inluding a mega solar flare, followed by nine X-class flares and several M-class flares), the Moscow Neutron Monitor experienced a major downward spike indicating a significant cosmic ray event, at the same time, Sonoma's real time gamma ray monitor registered eight back to back gamma ray bursts (later reduced to one long burst with multiple peaks by NASA's SWIFT Project team)Obviously, there must be a connection between these events. I'm curious to know if there were any significant gravity waves detected at the same time (or before or after)...

5)Are gravity waves a source for radiation? If so, how would this be measured or are we not there yet?

If anyone can offer me some assistance in answering these questions, I would very much appreciate it!

Cheers-Donna

I think no gravitational wave has ever been detected with certainty although in the sixties Joseph Weber at the University of Maryland has published an article titled "Evidence for discovery of gravitational radiation".using very massive aluminium cylinders as detectors.The fact is that they are very weak and looking for them is close to looking for a needle in a haystack.
Tullio

Hello Tullio:

Thank you very much for your informed reply...

So, I am Italian also, half anyway. My Italian side comes from Montella (my grandfather was Destefano), then I married/divorced a Sicilian and became a Volatile!

Anyway, nice to meet you Tullio and thank you again.

Kind regards-Donna

Speaking of Italy and GW, there was an Italian apparatus built in Frascati, near Rome, which used the kind of detectors pioneered by Weber, but putting them in a closed shell cooled by liquid helium, to reduce thermal noise. I don't know if it is still operating. But a new interferometer of the LIGO and GEOS kind has been built in Tuscany, at Cascina, and should start giving results soon.It is called VIRGO and I am looking forward to process its data to.. Cheers.
Tullio

Michael Karlinsky
Michael Karlinsky
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 888
Credit: 22,245,334
RAC: 0

There is an article by the

There is an article by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration presenting
preliminary results.

First report on the S3 analysis

(Link on the front page)

You might want to reserve some time...

Michael

Tom Awtry
Tom Awtry
Joined: 18 Jul 05
Posts: 100
Credit: 520,861
RAC: 0
Chipper Q
Chipper Q
Joined: 20 Feb 05
Posts: 1,540
Credit: 708,571
RAC: 0

Hi, Donna - To help with

Hi, Donna -
To help with question 4 above, and help acquaint you with the forum, there are good discussions (with informative links) in both these threads, (when you have some time) -
The Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) picked up by MAGIC
Prospective GW sources

Donna
Donna
Joined: 21 Oct 05
Posts: 29
Credit: 8,600
RAC: 0

RE: Hi, Donna - To help

Message 18851 in response to message 18850

Quote:
Hi, Donna -
To help with question 4 above, and help acquaint you with the forum, there are good discussions (with informative links) in both these threads, (when you have some time) -
The Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) picked up by MAGIC
Prospective GW sources

Thanks Chipper. I did review the links you provided.

I put the horse before the cart with some of my questions, I suppose. Thanks for your assistance. Kind regards-Donna

Donna
Donna
Joined: 21 Oct 05
Posts: 29
Credit: 8,600
RAC: 0

RE: Another informative

Message 18852 in response to message 18849

Quote:

Another informative link to absorb is Theory of Gravitational Waves & LIGO

Welcome Aboard,
Tom

Thank you Tom. I feel a bit more acclimated after researching the links.

Cheers-Donna

Donna
Donna
Joined: 21 Oct 05
Posts: 29
Credit: 8,600
RAC: 0

RE: There is an article by

Message 18853 in response to message 18848

Quote:

There is an article by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration presenting
preliminary results.

First report on the S3 analysis

(Link on the front page)

You might want to reserve some time...

Michael

I have done so and read the partial report. Many thanks-Donna

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