PBS Television--Part I of III 'Elegant Universe'

R/B
R/B
Joined: 11 Aug 05
Posts: 70
Credit: 24,276
RAC: 0
Topic 191200

PBS Television--Part I of III 'Elegant Universe'.

Tonight 8pm Eastern time. Sorry for not posting this sooner. It his hosted by physicist and author Brian Greene. This has been on before so will likely be reaired. Perhaps west coast viewers will see it at 8pm their time.

Einstein's gravity waves are being discussed.

Founder of BOINC group, Objectivists, a group of philosophically minded rational data crunchers.

Chipper Q
Chipper Q
Joined: 20 Feb 05
Posts: 1,540
Credit: 708,571
RAC: 0

PBS Television--Part I of III 'Elegant Universe'

It's actually possible to watch the show (all three hours) online, at your convenience. Additionally, there are links for slide shows, interactives, articles, and interviews. Courtesy pbs.org:
PBS Elegant Universe

Happy crunching... :)

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
Moderator
Joined: 1 Dec 05
Posts: 6,124
Credit: 124,424,244
RAC: 78,739

RE: It's actually possible

Message 30841 in response to message 30840

Quote:

It's actually possible to watch the show (all three hours) online, at your convenience. Additionally, there are links for slide shows, interactives, articles, and interviews. Courtesy pbs.org:
PBS Elegant Universe

Happy crunching... :)


Chipper, you are such a hoot to have around!
You know where all the good gear is... :-)
Cheers, Mike.

(edit) I quite enjoyed the link to the 'Hubble' Institute you gave the other day too... the Adam Reiss one about Supernovae as candles, absolutely fascinating! Particularly the bit which deals with dispersion of sample characteristics and the all important 'near' space calibration.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
Joined: 11 Jun 05
Posts: 57
Credit: 49,513
RAC: 0

PBS The Elegant

PBS The Elegant Universe

Theirs a clip on this show that talks about a looped string sealing a tear in subspace, I’m curious about the tube that drags behind the string.

What causes it?
How long does that tube stretch?

Can someone point me in the right direction to get these questions answered?

Ernie S
Team Art Bell
God Bless

Chipper Q
Chipper Q
Joined: 20 Feb 05
Posts: 1,540
Credit: 708,571
RAC: 0

Ernie, here are the links to

Ernie, here are the links to the transcripts of the show; if you'd be kind enough to find the block of text that pertains to your question, and copy/post it, then it may be easier to answer.
Hour 1: Einstein's Dream
Hour 2: String's The Thing
Hour 3: Welcome to the 11th Dimension

Mike, this quote from Isaac Newton (quoted by Brian Greene in the 1st hour), seems quite apropos regarding me and all the good gear:
“ I have been like a boy playing on the sea shore, diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than usual, while the great ocean of truth lay before me, all undiscovered.� Smart cookie, that Isaac Newton! :)

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
Joined: 11 Jun 05
Posts: 57
Credit: 49,513
RAC: 0

RE: Ernie, here are the

Message 30844 in response to message 30843

Quote:

Ernie, here are the links to the transcripts of the show; if you'd be kind enough to find the block of text that pertains to your question, and copy/post it, then it may be easier to answer.
Hour 1: Einstein's Dream
Hour 2: String's The Thing
Hour 3: Welcome to the 11th Dimension

Mike, this quote from Isaac Newton (quoted by Brian Greene in the 1st hour), seems quite apropos regarding me and all the good gear:
“ I have been like a boy playing on the sea shore, diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than usual, while the great ocean of truth lay before me, all undiscovered.� Smart cookie, that Isaac Newton! :)

Chipper,

The text is about 1/2 way through the 1st clip of the 3rd hour. I too like Newtons quote, my favorite quote was the discription of M theory "Its an upside down W for Witton".
Thank you for your replys...

Ernie
Team Art Bell
God Bless

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
Joined: 11 Jun 05
Posts: 57
Credit: 49,513
RAC: 0

RE: RE: Ernie, here are

Message 30845 in response to message 30844

Quote:
Quote:

Ernie, here are the links to the transcripts of the show; if you'd be kind enough to find the block of text that pertains to your question, and copy/post it, then it may be easier to answer.
Hour 1: Einstein's Dream
Hour 2: String's The Thing
Hour 3: Welcome to the 11th Dimension

Mike, this quote from Isaac Newton (quoted by Brian Greene in the 1st hour), seems quite apropos regarding me and all the good gear:
“ I have been like a boy playing on the sea shore, diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than usual, while the great ocean of truth lay before me, all undiscovered.� Smart cookie, that Isaac Newton! :)

Chipper,

The text is about 1/2 way through the 1st clip of the 3rd hour. I too like Newtons quote, my favorite quote was the discription of M theory "Its an upside down W for Witton".
Thank you for your replys...

Ernie
Team Art Bell
God Bless

Well, this is where the power of strings comes in. Strings calm the chaos.
And as a single string dances through space, it sweeps out a tube. The Tube can
act as a bubble that surrounds the tear. A protective shield with profound implications. Strings make it possible for space to rip.

Chipper Q
Chipper Q
Joined: 20 Feb 05
Posts: 1,540
Credit: 708,571
RAC: 0

Well, the 'tube' is what

Well, the 'tube' is what happens when the 'string' vibrates back and forth very rapidly. Picture a piece of a rubber band stretched between two fixed posts, or maybe better, picture a guitar: when you pluck a string, if you look closely, you'll see that it not only vibrates back and forth, but it is also vibrating up and down at the same time. So rather than looking like a flat ribbon as it vibrates, it looks more like a tube, even though you plucked it in only one direction. Brian Greene was explaining how the 'tube' might allow a surface with one shape (say a plate or saucer), to morph into a different surface (say a doughnut, which has a hole through it even though the surface is still what mathematicians call 'continuous'). How might a hole form in the surface of the shape without it tearing? A tear in the surface, for various reasons, doesn't fit well with either maths or physics. So I think Brian Greene was making a point that the strings of 'String Theory' might keep the fabric patched while it morphs around a tear, specifically regarding the situation where there's lots of mass in a very small volume of 3D space, like near a black hole, I think the rationale being that a wormhole is possible, in turn making possible the connection of points in space that are otherwise far apart in distance and/or time.

So what causes it and how far does it stretch? The strings vibrate in various patterns, to account for the various particles in the Standard Model, and according to the show, if you enlarged an atom to the size of the solar system, then these strings would be about the size of a tree, an eleven dimensional tree, so try to picture not an empty solar system, but millions forests stacked on top of each other, forest as far as the eye can see, for all the trees. :)

I hope I interpreted the show correctly...

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
Moderator
Joined: 1 Dec 05
Posts: 6,124
Credit: 124,424,244
RAC: 78,739

RE: Mike, this quote from

Message 30847 in response to message 30843

Quote:
Mike, this quote from Isaac Newton (quoted by Brian Greene in the 1st hour), seems quite apropos regarding me and all the good gear:
“ I have been like a boy playing on the sea shore, diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than usual, while the great ocean of truth lay before me, all undiscovered.� Smart cookie, that Isaac Newton! :)


It's a true joy, isn't it! Richard Feynman ( Nobel Prize for Quantum Electrodynamics ) had a similiar fascination with the seashore. I'll see if I can find his quotes for you ...... in my view he was a modern day Newton.
Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Ernesto Solis
Ernesto Solis
Joined: 11 Jun 05
Posts: 57
Credit: 49,513
RAC: 0

RE: Well, the 'tube' is

Message 30848 in response to message 30846

Quote:

Well, the 'tube' is what happens when the 'string' vibrates back and forth very rapidly. Picture a piece of a rubber band stretched between two fixed posts, or maybe better, picture a guitar: when you pluck a string, if you look closely, you'll see that it not only vibrates back and forth, but it is also vibrating up and down at the same time. So rather than looking like a flat ribbon as it vibrates, it looks more like a tube, even though you plucked it in only one direction. Brian Greene was explaining how the 'tube' might allow a surface with one shape (say a plate or saucer), to morph into a different surface (say a doughnut, which has a hole through it even though the surface is still what mathematicians call 'continuous'). How might a hole form in the surface of the shape without it tearing? A tear in the surface, for various reasons, doesn't fit well with either maths or physics. So I think Brian Greene was making a point that the strings of 'String Theory' might keep the fabric patched while it morphs around a tear, specifically regarding the situation where there's lots of mass in a very small volume of 3D space, like near a black hole, I think the rationale being that a wormhole is possible, in turn making possible the connection of points in space that are otherwise far apart in distance and/or time.

So what causes it and how far does it stretch? The strings vibrate in various patterns, to account for the various particles in the Standard Model, and according to the show, if you enlarged an atom to the size of the solar system, then these strings would be about the size of a tree, an eleven dimensional tree, so try to picture not an empty solar system, but millions forests stacked on top of each other, forest as far as the eye can see, for all the trees. :)

I hope I interpreted the show correctly...

Chipper,
Thank you for your reply sir.

Ernie S
Professional guitarist
Team Art Bell
God Bless You

tullio
tullio
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 2,032
Credit: 36,308,352
RAC: 111,753

RE: It's a true joy, isn't

Message 30849 in response to message 30847

Quote:
It's a true joy, isn't it! Richard Feynman ( Nobel Prize for Quantum Electrodynamics ) had a similiar fascination with the seashore. I'll see if I can find his quotes for you ...... in my view he was a modern day Newton.
Cheers, Mike.


He is not the only one to be fascinated by the seashore. Witness Benoit Mandelbrot's question "How long is the coast of England?" which gave origin to the science of fractals.
Tullio

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.