optimized applications

pluk
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Topic 194315

Recently I've learned that several versions of the E@h application are supplied to one's Boinc client amongst which a helper application will choose the one most appropriate to one's cpu's capabilities.

What I couldn't immediately find out though is which variant is optimized for which instruction-set. I can see _0 _1 and _2 variants of the einstein_S5R5_3.05_windows_intelx86 executable.

I can see that the switcher app chooses to elect the _2 one on my machine. But which one is that? The standard, the SSE-optimized or the SSE2-optimized ?

Bernd Machenschalk
Bernd Machenschalk
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optimized applications

_0 uses x87 arithmetic, _1 uses SSE instructions, _2 uses SSE2. SSE3 & up doesn't help enough to justify another application.

BM

BM

pluk
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Thanks. I started wondering

Message 92665 in response to message 92664

Thanks. I started wondering because the wingmen of a lot my workunits seem to report significantly less CPU-time per wu than my computer (ID: 1043520) does.

See, for instance these wu's :

http://einsteinathome.org/workunit/51587530
http://einsteinathome.org/workunit/51532767
http://einsteinathome.org/workunit/51457976
http://einsteinathome.org/workunit/51448871
http://einsteinathome.org/workunit/51409789

Since it is apparently employing the SSE2 optimized executable, I kinda would expect my pc's cpu-time to be equal or less, but not greater.

Any thoughts?

Alinator
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Well, all the wingmen you

Well, all the wingmen you listed have more 'horsepower' than your T7200, so shorter runtimes for them is nothing unusual.

Also, you might want to check that your host isn't dropping back into lower power mode when no one is using it.

Alinator

pluk
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Doh! good point. I was

Message 92667 in response to message 92666

Doh! good point. I was getting used to seeing such a dramatic drop in CPU-time from switching to (SSSE3) optimized apps for MilkyWay@- and SETI@home. I guess I wasn't thinking :-)

Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
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Hi! I've got a T7250

Hi!

I've got a T7250 myself (under Linux, tho, but that shouldn't matter that much anymore). The T7250 has a smaller cache but faster FSB than the T7200, it should be roughly comparable in performance:

http://einsteinathome.org/host/1081716/tasks

Your timings do not seem to be that bad compared to mine, but I'd also recommend to check that a "performance" power profile is set on your Windows system when it's not running on batteries (note you can actually instruct BOINC to suspend crunching altogether when running on batteries which might be a good idea after all on a notebook).

CU
Bikeman

pluk
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Thanks, Indeed I have BOINC

Thanks, Indeed I have BOINC configured to never run when it's on batteries, but then again, it hardly ever is ;)

As far as performance profiles go I'm not sure what else is there to tweak other than a basic foreground-/background processes preference.
Power options have mainly to do with when to turn off monitor and harddisk when on batteries ... nothing much cpu-related there.

mikey
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RE: Thanks, Indeed I have

Message 92670 in response to message 92669

Quote:

Thanks, Indeed I have BOINC configured to never run when it's on batteries, but then again, it hardly ever is ;)

As far as performance profiles go I'm not sure what else is there to tweak other than a basic foreground-/background processes preference.
Power options have mainly to do with when to turn off monitor and harddisk when on batteries ... nothing much cpu-related there.

Set your screensaver to not come on or to just blank the screen after x amount of time, set your harddrive to not shutdown, set you laptop to do nothing when you close the lid, set the laptop to not hibernate. All of these will keep your laptop crunching as it just sits there doing nothing else.

pluk
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RE: Set your screensaver to

Message 92671 in response to message 92670

Quote:
Set your screensaver to not come on or to just blank the screen after x amount of time, set your harddrive to not shutdown, set you laptop to do nothing when you close the lid, set the laptop to not hibernate. All of these will keep your laptop crunching as it just sits there doing nothing else.

Well, yeah, those things have been taken care of :) thanks. Though what I thought was intended by Alinator and perhaps Bikeman as well, was this laptop's cpu-throttling mechanism whose configuration one might be able to tap-in to... Perhaps this just isn't possible.. I really wouldn't know.

Alinator
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RE: RE: Set your

Message 92672 in response to message 92671

Quote:
Quote:
Set your screensaver to not come on or to just blank the screen after x amount of time, set your harddrive to not shutdown, set you laptop to do nothing when you close the lid, set the laptop to not hibernate. All of these will keep your laptop crunching as it just sits there doing nothing else.

Well, yeah, those things have been taken care of :) thanks. Though what I thought was intended by Alinator and perhaps Bikeman as well, was this laptop's cpu-throttling mechanism whose configuration one might be able to tap-in to... Perhaps this just isn't possible.. I really wouldn't know.

Yep...

I figured that you had covered all the OS related power options.

For the lower level builtin hardware ones, you can typically get to those from the BIOS, or sometimes special utilities provided by the OEM or MB manufacturer.

Also, one litle trick I've discovered which can help a lot, especially on late model laptops, is to not completely close the lid and prop up the back to let more air underneath it when you aren't using the machine if you crunch full time on it.

You'd be surprised how much this can drop the internal temp, and gain you some headroom to the generally non-overridable thermal protection limits.

Also, my experience has been that some kind of 'auxillary' cooling is a good idea for full time crunching on laptops. This can range from something as simple as a baking pan cooling rack and small table fan from Walmarts (10 bucks or so if you hit the sales right) to the far more elaborate (and expensive) commercial offerings. ;-)

Alinator

Mike Hewson
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RE: Also, one litle trick

Message 92673 in response to message 92672

Quote:
Also, one litle trick I've discovered which can help a lot, especially on late model laptops, is to not completely close the lid and prop up the back to let more air underneath it when you aren't using the machine if you crunch full time on it.

Also try, with the lid opened ~ 3 to 4 inches, turning the laptop to rest hinge side up with the free edges resting on the table top. So it looks like an upside-down vee, or a tent. Cooling will be assisted by natural convection through the gaps between keys in the face of the keyboard, to where the hot stuff generally is beneath and then out the rear/underside vents.

It costs nothing, and is but the work of a moment to swap between this and the working position! :-)

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter ...

... and my other CPU is a Ryzen 5950X :-) Blaise Pascal

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