Killing Boinc Process - Linux

arcturus
arcturus
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Topic 189335

I'm remotely administering a Linux box of mine through SSH running Einstein and discovered I can't 'kill -9 PID' for the running ./boincxxxx process.

My process state code is D+ and CPU utilization is 0, indicating something's wacked.

Anyone have a clue how to stop the process short of going over and rebooting?

Wurgl (speak^Wcrunching for Special: Off-Topic)
Wurgl (speak^Wc...
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Killing Boinc Process - Linux

I'm remotely administering a Linux box of mine through SSH running Einstein and discovered I can't 'kill -9 PID' for the running ./boincxxxx process.

My process state code is D+ and CPU utilization is 0, indicating something's wacked.

Anyone have a clue how to stop the process short of going over and rebooting?

The friendly way is kill -15, this is what the killall command during shutdown does. This way the application can save unsaved data and shut down clean. When you kill -9, you can corrupt whatever data and cause problems later.

BTW: kill -15 worked without problems so far, of cource the boinc process, not teh einstein cruncher.

arcturus
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didn't work. any other

didn't work. any other ideas?

wijata.com
wijata.com
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Well, if the process is in D

Well, if the process is in D state, then it waits for IO to complete (ie. disk read). You can't kill such process. You can send kill to it, but the system(linux) will defer killing task until it gets out of D state.

Another problem is why the task is in D state all the time. Propably buggy kernel/module or hardware.

Sorry, that the way of linux.

arcturus
arcturus
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Kill commands which aren't

Kill commands which aren't accepted can be symptomatic of a buggy and not fully supportive ./boinc client. Previous experiences in the Windows arena suggests this is more likely than any linux-based issue.

wijata.com
wijata.com
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Well, no process can ignore

Well, no process can ignore 'kill -9 PID' command. That's becouse no matter what process will do,
eventually kernel will kill him.
Most common reasons why killing process doesn't work are faulty hardware (so kernel can't finish kernel-mode operation for process) or buggy kernel itself (ie. binary module, which forgets to finish serving process).

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