An imaginary universe

PhiAlpha
PhiAlpha
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Topic 191714

Imagine that the Plank's constant is much larger (~ 10^-4) and the speed of light is much smaller (~ the speed of sound). I suspect such a universe cannot exist but, still, what are the consequences of these assumptions?

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler." A. Einstein

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
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An imaginary universe

Quote:
Imagine that the Plank's constant is much larger (~ 10^-4) and the speed of light is much smaller (~ the speed of sound). I suspect such a universe cannot exist but, still, what are the consequences of these assumptions?


It would be somewhat bizarre for us, assuming we can exist within it! Basically all of the consequences of quantum mechanics and relativity would be quite evident, without special effort on our part, at everyday scales. Stuff like 'tunnelling' through barriers say - though we may not then have a concept of a barrier like we do. As for the famous "Twin's Paradox", then we would all, twins or not, very much inhabit our own personal timeline which is a summation of significant time adjustments depending on our specific history of velocities. How would you arrange to meet for coffee "tomorrow" ? I think structures like orchards would be quit hazardous to pass through - you'd diffract all over the countryside!
I think some, if not all of this, has been aired in SciFi novels and the like...
Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Philip Martin Kryder
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RE: Imagine that the

Quote:
Imagine that the Plank's constant is much larger (~ 10^-4) and the speed of light is much smaller (~ the speed of sound). I suspect such a universe cannot exist but, still, what are the consequences of these assumptions?

I once asked part of this question - about the slower speed of light - and was told that relativistic effects would affect the mass of electrons in orbit around nuclei.

hossein mirabi
hossein mirabi
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thanks for your care .. my

thanks for your care .. my theory is in progress and there are a lot of diffkind equation made it complicated .... as soon as posible i will do that.
so i mean i want to rewrite the schrodinger equation , therefore you must be patience ..ok.

gravywavy
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RE: ...we would all ...

Message 44283 in response to message 44280

Quote:
...we would all ... inhabit our own personal timeline which is a summation of significant time adjustments depending on our specific history of velocities. How would you arrange to meet for coffee "tomorrow" ? ...

Arranging to meet would be easy - refer it to some outside referent like "Noon" (meaning when the sun is at its heghest in the sky, not the reading of a clock).

What we would not know is how long each of us has to wait till the meeting.

Paradoxically, if I am in a hurry to meet up with you, a quick trip away will make our meeting arriver quicker for me.

On the other hand if I am working on an assignment that I need to hand in when we meet, I want to keep as still as possible in order to give myself the longest elapsed time till the meeting. "Still" means as little accelration as possible, ideally I set of now and travel at constant speed and direction from where I am now to where we will meet, making sure I arrive exactly on time.

R~~

~~gravywavy

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