Gravitational wave astronomy

Dan G.
Dan G.
Joined: 10 Feb 07
Posts: 39
Credit: 97,382
RAC: 0
Topic 193326

Let's talk about the primary goal of gravitational wave detection: creating a whole new field of gravitational wave astronomy. What are the top 5 areas in which GW astronomy would prove useful vs. traditional photon astronomy or even infrared astronomy?

Cheers!

tullio
tullio
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 2,022
Credit: 32,525,382
RAC: 5,265

Gravitational wave astronomy

Quote:

Let's talk about the primary goal of gravitational wave detection: creating a whole new field of gravitational wave astronomy. What are the top 5 areas in which GW astronomy would prove useful vs. traditional photon astronomy or even infrared astronomy?

Cheers!


Maybe this meeting shall answer your question:
MIT December LSC-Virgo meeting
Tullio

Dan G.
Dan G.
Joined: 10 Feb 07
Posts: 39
Credit: 97,382
RAC: 0

Oh yes, I attend most of the

Message 75445 in response to message 75444

Oh yes, I attend most of the LSC/LIGO meetings. They serve as a way to keep posted on all that is happening in the world of gravitational wave research. Very exciting field.

Nereid
Nereid
Joined: 9 Feb 05
Posts: 79
Credit: 925,034
RAC: 0

RE: Let's talk about the

Quote:

Let's talk about the primary goal of gravitational wave detection: creating a whole new field of gravitational wave astronomy. What are the top 5 areas in which GW astronomy would prove useful vs. traditional photon astronomy or even infrared astronomy?

Cheers!


In a light-hearted spirit, and one at a time (i.e. one per post), and not necessarily in order:

- local rate of NS-NS and NS-BH mergers (and BH-BH mergers too?).

tullio
tullio
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 2,022
Credit: 32,525,382
RAC: 5,265

This summary is from the

This summary is from the December issue of CERN Courier. Unluckily, there is no mention of Einstein@home:
GW research cooperation
Tullio

B.I.G
B.I.G
Joined: 26 Oct 07
Posts: 57
Credit: 273,225,526
RAC: 280,607

I am wondering wether a

I am wondering wether a successful detection of a gravitational wave is going to change anything soon. We still are not able to detect the wave itself, only the reaction it is causing. Furthermore we are waiting for years not to detect a single wave.
To really open the gate to a new era we have to be able to detect the waves themselves. I don't see how the detection of a wave by Einstein@home is going to change anything on that problem except that we then at least know a bit more and increased founding in that area maybe. Which actually would be quite a lot already.

rbpeake
rbpeake
Joined: 18 Jan 05
Posts: 247
Credit: 219,266,664
RAC: 0

RE: I am wondering wether a

Message 75449 in response to message 75448

Quote:
I am wondering wether a successful detection of a gravitational wave is going to change anything soon. We still are not able to detect the wave itself, only the reaction it is causing. Furthermore we are waiting for years not to detect a single wave.
To really open the gate to a new era we have to be able to detect the waves themselves. I don't see how the detection of a wave by Einstein@home is going to change anything on that problem except that we then at least know a bit more and increased founding in that area maybe. Which actually would be quite a lot already.


Here is a nice summary article on the "state-of-the-art".

tullio
tullio
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 2,022
Credit: 32,525,382
RAC: 5,265

MIT meeting program:MIT One

MIT meeting program:
MIT
One of the speakers is named Giovanni Prodi. I had a math professor at Trieste of that name, but he was the oldest of the Prodi brothers/professors and cannot be him. Maybe a relative?
Tullio

Gerry Rough
Gerry Rough
Joined: 1 Mar 05
Posts: 102
Credit: 1,847,066
RAC: 0

I hope this isn't something

I hope this isn't something already posted, but...

Awhile back I read something about a new GW proposal that used satellites and laser beams between them to detect gravity waves. I do not remember much about it, but is E@h going to tackle that data as well if it is ever funded and launched into orbit?


(Click for detailed stats)

Andreas
Andreas
Joined: 19 Oct 05
Posts: 754
Credit: 28,396,085
RAC: 8,738

RE: I hope this isn't

Message 75452 in response to message 75451

Quote:

I hope this isn't something already posted, but...

Awhile back I read something about a new GW proposal that used satellites and laser beams between them to detect gravity waves. I do not remember much about it, but is E@h going to tackle that data as well if it is ever funded and launched into orbit?

That's sounds like LISA, Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, a joint NASA-ESA project.
http://www.esa.int/esaSC/120376_index_0_m.html

Click my stat image to go to the BOINC Synergy Team site!

Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
Bikeman (Heinz-...
Moderator
Joined: 28 Aug 06
Posts: 3,515
Credit: 450,880,169
RAC: 100,362

Here's another link, this one

Here's another link, this one from NASA

http://lisa.nasa.gov/

The launch is scheduled to be in 2015, and the three spacecraft will need an additional 13 months to reach their operational positions. Add several more months for testing, calibrating etc, so the first batch of data from LISA might not be available until 2016-2017. LISA is one of the bigger, more expensive missions, so any budget cuts might further delay the project, especially since it will compete for resources with the more prestigious "Return to the Moon" program by that time.

CU
Bikeman

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.