FAQ: throttle CPU

Timmehhh
Timmehhh
Joined: 22 Oct 12
Posts: 3
Credit: 1,465,354
RAC: 0
Topic 197759

http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/faq.php#throttle

Quote:

BOINC / E@H keeps my CPU at 100%. Is there any way to throttle it?

Answer not written yet.

http://efmer.com/b/

Two BOINC related applications are hosted on this site. TThrottle is of particular interest. I run this application always while running BOINC. It throttles BOINC tasks so my CPU temp does not exceed 60 degrees C, or my GPU 80 degrees C. These temperatures are arbitrary and can be easily changed.

Note that CPUs currently tend to be designed with a Tjunction temperature of 100 degrees C, over which the computer will perform an emergency shutdown to prevent damage. Commonly refered to as overheating. A CPU should be able to withstand these temperatures for sustained periods. However I suspect that constant operation at high temperatures may increase the rate of degradation of the thermal paste, compromising heat dissipation and increasing likelyhood of overheating with time. This is purely speculation on my part, however anyone with similar concerns may install TThrottle to put their mind at ease whilst continuing to contribute.

There are other ways of throttling CPU usage, however these commit to a certain percentage of CPU usage, rather than a feedback loop based on system temperatures.

Either way, I suggest adding this program link to the FAQ section as highlighted above.

mikey
mikey
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 9,071
Credit: 1,077,154,114
RAC: 5,795,220

FAQ: throttle CPU

Quote:

http://einstein.phys.uwm.edu/faq.php#throttle

Quote:

BOINC / E@H keeps my CPU at 100%. Is there any way to throttle it?

Answer not written yet.

http://efmer.com/b/

Two BOINC related applications are hosted on this site. TThrottle is of particular interest. I run this application always while running BOINC. It throttles BOINC tasks so my CPU temp does not exceed 60 degrees C, or my GPU 80 degrees C. These temperatures are arbitrary and can be easily changed.

Note that CPUs currently tend to be designed with a Tjunction temperature of 100 degrees C, over which the computer will perform an emergency shutdown to prevent damage. Commonly refered to as overheating. A CPU should be able to withstand these temperatures for sustained periods. However I suspect that constant operation at high temperatures may increase the rate of degradation of the thermal paste, compromising heat dissipation and increasing likelyhood of overheating with time. This is purely speculation on my part, however anyone with similar concerns may install TThrottle to put their mind at ease whilst continuing to contribute.

There are other ways of throttling CPU usage, however these commit to a certain percentage of CPU usage, rather than a feedback loop based on system temperatures.

Either way, I suggest adding this program link to the FAQ section as highlighted above.

TThrottle IS a good program to have in the toolbox!!

That being said by the time a cpu gets destroyed thru constant but 'within normal limits' high temps you will probably want to be replacing it anyway. I have had cpu's and cpu's running for several years now with little to no degradation in their performance or output as long as they stay withing the recommended temps. I have been running pc's on Distributed Computing projects full time since 1999 and not one pc has died from normal crunching. I HAVE had cpu's and gpu's die, but that was due to insufficient air flow into and out of the pc or laptop. Under normal circumstances that should not happen on a desktop, nor on a laptop if you give it some underneath cooling.

I HAVE replaced some thermal paste applications over the years, but that was more me trying to improve performance beyond the normal, than an actual problem. Such as when a newer and better cpu cooler comes out and my budget allows me to 'try it', a new application of thermal paste is always preferable to leaving the old stuff on. Cooler means being able to push it a little harder to get the temps back to where they were before, possibly giving better performance.

Timmehhh
Timmehhh
Joined: 22 Oct 12
Posts: 3
Credit: 1,465,354
RAC: 0

Nice info thanks. I know the

Nice info thanks. I know the CPU should be fine, but my last laptop developed overheating issues well before it should have. And I'm not sure if running BOINC contributed. Although it was a first gen i7. Needless to say my new laptop has excellent cooling, but I still like to keep temperatures low. Replacing thermal paste on a laptop is not quite as easy as a desktop.

Though I suspect that a laptop would be subject to more flexing and vibrations than a desktop, courtesy of its mobility, which may affect seal between CPU/thermal paste/heat sink.

mikey
mikey
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 9,071
Credit: 1,077,154,114
RAC: 5,795,220

RE: Nice info thanks. I

Quote:

Nice info thanks. I know the CPU should be fine, but my last laptop developed overheating issues well before it should have. And I'm not sure if running BOINC contributed. Although it was a first gen i7. Needless to say my new laptop has excellent cooling, but I still like to keep temperatures low. Replacing thermal paste on a laptop is not quite as easy as a desktop.

Though I suspect that a laptop would be subject to more flexing and vibrations than a desktop, courtesy of its mobility, which may affect seal between CPU/thermal paste/heat sink.

I lost a hard drive many years ago in a laptop but have never had any cooling problems in one, I DO have a cooling fan under each one, a store bought setup, that runs 24/7 and am only using 5 of the 8 possible cores, 4 regular plus 4 HT, to crunch with. Boinc is using 62.5% of the cpu cores but using them 100% of the time. The cpu temps are in the high 70's all the time.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.