Einstein@Home discovers a second new radio pulsar in Arecibo "Mock" data!

Einstein@Home has discovered a fourth new radio pulsar, J1952+25, in data from the Arecibo Observatory. This is the second Einstein@Home discovery in Arecibo data taken with the new "Mock" back-end spectrometer. Further details about the newly-discovered pulsar can be found on this web page, and will be published in due course.

Congratulations to our volunteers, and thank you for contributing to Einstein@Home! We have found 14 radio pulsars so far, and I am also optimistic about our prospects for discovering new gamma-ray pulsars and continuous gravitational-wave sources.

Bruce Allen
Director, Einstein@Home

Comments

Rechenkuenstler
Rechenkuenstler
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Einstein@Home discovers a second new radio pulsar in Arecibo "Mo

That's good news. But there is no access allowed to view the details of the data.

I mean the E@H result and the prefold page

Benjamin_28
Benjamin
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Ah, that's odd. Thanks for

Ah, that's odd. Thanks for spotting this, Rechenkuenstler, we'll fix this as soon as possible.

Cheers,
Benjamin

[edit: 12:44 UTC] Problem fixed, plots are available now. Sorry for the hassle.

Mike Hewson
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RE: .. and I am also

Quote:
.. and I am also optimistic about our prospects for discovering new gamma-ray pulsars and continuous gravitational-wave sources.


Yeah, it's great that the algorithms and the pipeline ( utilising the E@H supercomputer to enact them ) are obviously working quite well. Congrats all round !! :-) :-)

Cheers, Mike.

"I have made this letter longer than usual, because I lack the time to make it short." - Blaise Pascal

Stranger7777
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RE: I am also optimistic

Quote:

I am also optimistic about our prospects for discovering new gamma-ray pulsars and continuous gravitational-wave sources.

Bruce Allen
Director, Einstein@Home

Please, don't stop on this stage and look further for the main and new aims of the project. And we will complete the pulsar survey and make a new stars catalogue vol."pulsars" for you.

Bikeman _Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein_
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Congratulations! BTW, is

Congratulations!

BTW, is there a predominant theory what is causing a pulsar like this to be intermittent/nulling?

Cheers
HBE

hoarfrost
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Einstein@Home seems to be

Einstein@Home seems to be stronger and stronger!
And more than 520 TFLOPS for project!

Benjamin_28
Benjamin
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RE: BTW, is there a

Quote:

BTW, is there a predominant theory what is causing a pulsar like this to be intermittent/nulling?

No, no one really knows what is causing pulsars to stop their emission from time to time.

In the early years it looked like this was something happening mainly in older pulsars. When the pulsars have emitted part of their kinetic energy and are spinning slower and slower, they seem to turn off. The combination of magnetic field strength and spin period isn't strong enough to support further emission of radio waves. Since the intermittence was first seen mainly in older pulsars it was believed that this was the beginning of switching off the radio emission. Later it was showed that the correlation between age and nulling/intermittency was not that clear.

A different idea is that the intermittency might be related to asteroid belts near the pulsar. When asteroids get close enough to the pulsar, say because of some orbital perturbance by other asteroids, they can be basically evaporated by the pulsar. This results in the generation of charged particles which are then injected into the pulsar magnetosphere, where they can alter the radio emission of the pulsar. This, in the end could be a plausible explanation for the intermittency / nulling. Details can be found in this article.

Cheers,
Benjamin

Bikeman _Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein_
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Cool, thanks for the

Cool, thanks for the link!

So it least it seems that the theories focus on intrinsic changes of the radiation (it actually stops or gets significantly weaker). At least I didn't see any discussion of extrinsic effects in the sense that the pulsed radiation does continue but it's somehow blocked (eclipsed, deflected, dispersed?) or just misses Earth because of changes/precession? in the lighthouse beam geometry.

CU
HB

Benjamin_28
Benjamin
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Yup, the idea is that it's

Yup, the idea is that it's something happening right at the pulsar itself.

Changes because of emission due to geodetic precession are also observed in pulsars. This requires a binary pulsar where because of GR effects the rotation axis of the pulsar can precess and turn away from Earth over time; but that usually is an effect seen over many years rather than days or shorter time scales. A famous example is the double pulsar, which was discovered as a system in which both neutron stars were visible as pulsars. As of today only one of the pulsars is visible as a pulsar, the other has precessed away from us and should show up in 20 years or so (I'd have to look that up) again.

Cheers,
Ben

Gary LaMotte
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Is there a primer or other

Is there a primer or other recommended reading available that describes how to interpret the E@H results and prepfold results in the data display graphics for the pulsars which have been found? I don't know how to read these.

Bernd Machenschalk
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I think you'll find what

I think you'll find what you're looking for if you dig through Benjamins ols posts, in particular in this thread.

BM

BM