Einstein@Home discovers a new radio pulsar in Arecibo data

I am delighted to announce that Einstein@Home has discovered a third new radio pulsar in data from the Arecibo Observatory. This is the first Einstein@Home discovery in Arecibo data taken with the new "Mock" back-end spectrometer. The pulsar is unusually interesting, as is a short-period (millisecond) pulsar in a binary system. Further details about the newly-discovered pulsar can be found on this web page, and will be published in due course.

Congratulations to our volunteers, and thank you for contributing to Einstein@Home!

Bruce Allen
Director, Einstein@Home

Comments

Mike Hewson
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Einstein@Home discovers a new radio pulsar in Arecibo data

Neat! Our first Mock, and another rare bird too ! :-)

Cheers, Mike.

pascal_sig.jpg

Bruce Allen
Bruce Allen
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RE: Neat! Our first Mock,

Quote:
Neat! Our first Mock, and another rare bird too ! :-)

Yes, it's very satisfying!

Rechenkuenstler
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Then let's go ahead to

Then let's go ahead to discover the first gamma ray pulsar.

Congratulations to all. That's a big motivation

Mexonius
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yep, very confortable for all

yep, very confortable for all of us! this is what is said "good teamwork" :P
I think we can all be proud of our commitment to science :P

Thx you too Mr Bruce!

AMONRA
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RE: Then let's go ahead to

Quote:
Then let's go ahead to discover the first gamma ray pulsar.

Let's hope it happens soon!

MAGIC Quantum Mechanic
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Thanks for the info Bruce.


Thanks for the info Bruce.

TeamStreetLegal
TeamStreetLegal
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Hi there, just one little

Hi there, just one little question:

When looking at the graphics of the Einstein@home Workunit for the Binary Radio Pulsar Search (Arecibo) v1.00 (BRP3SSE), especially the Arecibo Power Spectrum at the top right corner and i am seeing the first 2 to 3 bars on the left highlighted white with a higher Peak than the other bars aside -> would this fall into the category "possible Candidate" or "something else" (maybe something "already known")?

The Workunit i am talking about had the Task ID: "254159161" (Name: "p2030.20091122.G69.24+00.28.N.b4s0g0.00000_224_0") and Work unit ID: "108164397" (Name: "p2030.20091122.G69.24+00.28.N.b4s0g0.00000_224").

Didn't see it in the list of the already know Pulsars, so that's how my question came up, when i was thinking about if this could be a sign (or if this is a typical sign) of something special or just something regular/already known.

Robert,
from Germany

Benjamin_28
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Hi Robert, we'll see. It

Hi Robert,

we'll see. It could be a pulsar at low frequencies, so one that's spinning rather not very fast. It's also possible that this is so-called radio frequency interference ("RFI" for short). RFI are any man-made radio signals that also show up in astronomical observations of radio telescopes. This can be radar stations, GPS satellites, cell phones, sparking plugs in car engines, etc., etc.

These RFI signals happen at the Earth so they are not dispersed, i.e. unlike celestial signals they don't have to travel trough the interstellar medium. This is reflected in the fact that the RFI usually is strongest at low dispersion measure (an indirect measure of the astronomical distance). The dispersion measure is encoded in the workunit name, it's given by the numbers after the last "_", here the number "224" means that the dispersion measure is 22.4 pc/cm^3, which would correspond to an astronomical source rather close to Earth.

In short: if this is a new pulsar, you'll find it showing up on the discovery page at some point, because this certainly should show up in our post-processing.

Thanks for the watchful eye!

Cheers,
Benjamin

 

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KWSN-GMC-Peeper of the Castle Anthrax
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I've been doing this all so

I've been doing this all so long I don't actually keep up on a day to day..or even year to year basis anymore.
Do we actually have capability to detect gamma ray 'signals'?

Benjamin_28
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Hi, since July 2011

Hi,

since July 2011 Einstein@Home has also been analyzing data from the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard NASA's Fermi satellite, which detects gamma rays. The satellite has already found gamma ray pulsars in these data (not with Einstein@Home). You can find more details on the Einstein@Home search in this thread: http://einsteinathome.org/node/195842.

Cheers,
Benjamin

 

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KWSN-GMC-Peeper of the Castle Anthrax
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thanks for responding. and so

thanks for responding. and so promptly.

Bikeman _Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein_
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Congratulations to the

Congratulations to the volunteers and scientists involved!

As for the spectrum display in the screen saver/ graphics app: because of an optimization in the CUDA code, this is not very accurate (in short, signals that are too weak to have a chance to make it into the final top-list of signals that is reported back to the server are written back to main memory by the CUDA app. This is the reason why the spectrum display is usually rather unspectacular.

HBE

Wcheney
Wcheney
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Really nice to know that all

Really nice to know that all the work amounts to something Significant!!!
Congratulations to all!
Bill

hoarfrost
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On Einstein@Home Binary Radio

On Einstein@Home Binary Radio Pulsar Search Progress Page, in Search progress on copied beams graphic gray and blue colors have a one sense - 0% processed beams. May be mark all unprocessed beams as blue?

Benjamin_28
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Hi! The beams in blue are

Hi!

The beams in blue are processed by slightly more than 0%, maybe a few percent; but it's not so much that the color would change significantly to green or something else. Look at them in 24 hours and you'll see the progress. Processing of the grey beams has not started at all, that's the difference.

Cheers, Benjamin

 

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hoarfrost
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RE: Hi! The beams in blue

Quote:

Hi!

The beams in blue are processed by slightly more than 0%, maybe a few percent; but it's not so much that the color would change significantly to green or something else. Look at them in 24 hours and you'll see the progress. Processing of the grey beams has not started at all, that's the difference.

Cheers, Benjamin


Hi!

I know, that NULL is not equal to 0. :)
But if beams with not started processing will be painted in color of zero processed beams - it is would be clear and handsome.

Benjamin_28
Benjamin
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RE: But if beams with not

Quote:
But if beams with not started processing will be painted in color of zero processed beams - it is would be clear and handsome.

That's not what I would like to see in the plots. Doing it this way means losing the information that the processing of this beam has not started at all; this means that the data have been copied to the pre-processing maching at the AEI in Hannover, but that they have not yet been sent out to Einstein@Home volunteers. You're right that (judging by processing percentage) alone there's no difference between grey and blue, but that's not the whole picture. There is a difference between not started at all (=grey) and started processing with 0 < x% progress (=blue) beams, that I want to show in the plots.

Cheers, Benjamin

 

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