Einstein Telescope

tullio
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Topic 193930

It looks like a new GW observatory is in project. The home page is still under construction and my Firefox was suspicious about it.
Here it is:
Einstein Telescope
Tullio

tullio
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Einstein Telescope

On Nature magazine I read that VIRGO is out of commission because of a hardware problem (a broken glass window). On the VIRGO site I learned of a meeting in Amsterdam which will be attended by both Bruce Allen and Maria Alessandra Papa. Since one of the problems of the new Einstein Telescope will be data processing I hope that they will put forward the case for distributed volunteer computing, that is us crunchers.
Tullio

Chipper Q
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RE: It looks like a new GW

Quote:
It looks like a new GW observatory is in project. The home page is still under construction and my Firefox was suspicious about it.
Here it is:
Einstein Telescope
Tullio


Thanks for the heads-up Tullio :)

It's hard to tell from the picture on that page ~ is it a triangular configuration (like LISA) instead of the orthogonal arms? (In terms of the data pipeline, is there a difference in the throughput between the two types - does one produce more data per unit time?)

Looks like it's buried quite deep. Better seismic isolation at a specific depth? On the bedrock? For sure doesn't look like a delivery truck or the wind would have any effect, as can happen at ground level with instruments that sensitive.

And 100 times more sensitive than 1st generation instruments is incredible!

tullio
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RE: It's hard to tell from

Message 85604 in response to message 85603

Quote:


It's hard to tell from the picture on that page ~ is it a triangular configuration (like LISA) instead of the orthogonal arms? (In terms of the data pipeline, is there a difference in the throughput between the two types - does one produce more data per unit time?)

Looks like it's buried quite deep. Better seismic isolation at a specific depth? On the bedrock? For sure doesn't look like a delivery truck or the wind would have any effect, as can happen at ground level with instruments that sensitive.

And 100 times more sensitive than 1st generation instruments is incredible!


Better wait for the Amsterdam Conference at the end of this month. I see that dr.Allen will attend it. Maybe he will answer your questions. Data processing is one of the problems. I have watched the greenlist of the top500 computers and ATLAS is not very efficient if measured in megaflops/watt. See here:
Greenlist
Maybe Einstein@home can have a role. Cheers.
Tullio

tullio
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Here are some news from CERN

Here are some news from CERN Bulletin:
Einstein Telescope
Tullio

Rapture
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That is exciting! More data

Message 85606 in response to message 85605

That is exciting! More data for us to crunch in the years to come as far as the eye can see! :)

Mike Hewson
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Item 5 of the preliminary

Item 5 of the preliminary program for our July public event at AEI Hannover seems to indicate this topic may be addressed then. It is certainly an exciting prospect/design and when up and running, or even just testing, I'd love E@H to play a part. The specification is worth a closer look, I'll get back on that. I get a 404 error on the previous link so try this instead.

I think it is also worth noting that even though we haven't found a GW yet, E@H has already played an important role in testing/trialling/understanding the data analysis pipeline techniques that any similar project will need. You see it's not going to be enough to just catch a wave, you also have to definitely know that it is such - unequivocally and demonstrably so. This hence relies on confidence in the process .....

E@H having 'runs on the board' in the EM pulsar department would be a strong point - assuming anyone needs convincing - to use a free distributed supercomputer, running at 351.1 TFlops as of today! :-)

Cheers, Mike.

( edit ) Here's a very recent 450+ page PDF design document - of which Bruce Allen is a co-author among many, being part of the ET Science Team.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

tullio
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On the subject of volunteer

On the subject of volunteer computing taking part in scientific research go to the BOINC home page, Brasil@home, Program, and see the video with dr Ben Segal of CERN speaking about LHC@home, new version. I am participating in that project.
Tullio

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RE: ( edit ) Here's a very

Message 85609 in response to message 85607

Quote:
( edit ) Here's a very recent 450+ page PDF design document - of which Bruce Allen is a co-author among many, being part of the ET Science Team.

Impressive stuff. Certainly pushing the frontiers of physics and construction! Rather a long timescale and looks expensive.

One interesting little snippet: The chart on page 35 (pdf page 37) suggests that we should be able to detect the Crab Nebula pulsar with the present GW detectors. However, we'll need the x100 sensitivity of the proposed ET detector to be able to see many others that are near to us.

Greatly deserving stuff but I hope it doesn't distract from the continued operation of the LHC and also the push for fusion power at ITER (and elsewhere)...

Do you think we can pull in some funds from somewhere?! :-)

Keep searchin',
Martin

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tullio
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ITER has tripled its cost

ITER has tripled its cost from 5 billion dollars to 15 billion dollars and is draining most of European research funds with no target in sight.
Tullio

Mike Hewson
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RE: RE: ( edit ) Here's a

Message 85611 in response to message 85609

Quote:
Quote:
( edit ) Here's a very recent 450+ page PDF design document - of which Bruce Allen is a co-author among many, being part of the ET Science Team.

Impressive stuff. Certainly pushing the frontiers of physics and construction! Rather a long timescale and looks expensive.

One interesting little snippet: The chart on page 35 (pdf page 37) suggests that we should be able to detect the Crab Nebula pulsar with the present GW detectors. However, we'll need the x100 sensitivity of the proposed ET detector to be able to see many others that are near to us.

Greatly deserving stuff but I hope it doesn't distract from the continued operation of the LHC and also the push for fusion power at ITER (and elsewhere)...

Do you think we can pull in some funds from somewhere?! :-)


I'm going to read through it and present a summary, but at the get go I'd say it represents a long term plan for an entire observational strategy and evolving infrastructure - as opposed to a specific static instrument design. Sort of like an Hawaiian mountain top layout which can host a variety of upgradeable facilities in the optical range. I believe there is/was a group looking very closely at LIGO noise sources/budgets ( I sense there was some disappointment at the enhanced LIGO performance ie. S6 run ) and my guess is that their conclusions have probably been fed into the design thinking of ET.

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

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