Congratulations!

rbpeake
rbpeake
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Topic 193196

Congratulations to all the project scientists on completing a year of S5 data at LIGO design sensitivity! What an accomplishment, that is really tremendous!

From following your progress here, we know of all the time, effort, ingenuity, and persistence that went into achieving this goal...and it paid off! :D

We will eagerly follow your progress as you move on and up to the next stage!

MSE29
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Congratulations!

Best congratulations to the project scientist!
We all hope Einstein@home will end to the utmost satisfaction of everybody!

I'll keep my fingers crossed and crunch as much as possible.

With best regards
MfG
MSE29

Best regards

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Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
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Congratulations to all

Congratulations to all involved in this stunning experiment!

It's amazing that an instrument that can measure a change in distance as small as a tiny fraction of the diameter of a proton can still be improved. It really feels good to be able to contribute to the effort to find something in the data that was collected with these unbelievable sensitive instruments.

Cheers
H-BE

Stranger7777
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Congratulations to everybody,

Congratulations to everybody, every participan and scientist member of the projetct. We are looking for new exciting reports on this (and previous S4) run and looking forward to win in this competition with physics enigma.
BTW, it will be very interesting to place in server status page a volume of calculations made measured not only in TFLOPs, but by the productivity of the TOP supercomputer in the world (sorry, I don't know the power and name of the most powerful supercomputer). Is it possible?

tullio
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RE: Congratulations to

Message 73689 in response to message 73688

Quote:
Congratulations to everybody, every participan and scientist member of the projetct. We are looking for new exciting reports on this (and previous S4) run and looking forward to win in this competition with physics enigma.
BTW, it will be very interesting to place in server status page a volume of calculations made measured not only in TFLOPs, but by the productivity of the TOP supercomputer in the world (sorry, I don't know the power and name of the most powerful supercomputer). Is it possible?


I think it is IBM BluGene/L (280.6 teraflops). But the 37000 odd PS3 crunching Folding@home have reached almost 1 petaflop.
Tullio

AgnosticPope
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RE: RE: Congratulations

Message 73690 in response to message 73689

Quote:
Quote:
Congratulations to everybody, every participan and scientist member of the projetct. We are looking for new exciting reports on this (and previous S4) run and looking forward to win in this competition with physics enigma.
BTW, it will be very interesting to place in server status page a volume of calculations made measured not only in TFLOPs, but by the productivity of the TOP supercomputer in the world (sorry, I don't know the power and name of the most powerful supercomputer). Is it possible?

I think it is IBM BluGene/L (280.6 teraflops). But the 37000 odd PS3 crunching Folding@home have reached almost 1 petaflop.
Tullio

According to the list of The Top 500 Supercomputer Sites, you are correct, Tullio. Of course, that list necessarily only lists the unclassified sites. I would not be the least bit surprised to find a classified supercomputer could perform substantially better.

The Wikipedia article on Blue Gene has more to say:

Quote:
On October 27, 2005, LLNL and IBM announced that Blue Gene/L had once again broken its speed record, reaching 280.6 TFLOPS on Linpack, upon reaching its final configuration of 65,536 "compute nodes" (i.e., 216 nodes) and an additional 1024 "I/O nodes" in 64 air-cooled cabinets. The LLNL Blue Gene/L uses Lustre to access a 900TB filesystem.

If you dig into the Blue Gene architecture, it is really a network of 65,536 powerful PC chips:

Quote:
Each Compute or I/O node is a single ASIC with associated DRAM memory chips. The ASIC integrates two 700 MHz PowerPC 440 embedded processors, each with a double-pipeline-double-precision Floating Point Unit (FPU), a cache sub-system with built-in DRAM controller and the logic to support multiple communication sub-systems. The dual FPUs give each BlueGene/L node a theoretical peak performance of 5.6 GFLOPS (gigaFLOPS). Node CPUs are not cache coherent with one another.

So, essentially is is just Boinc with all the computers owned by one entity and all under common control. That is why Boinc is such a valuable resource: it gives scientists access to the largest possible computing power without needing to actually pay for it.

The developmental direction for Blue Gene is obvious:

Quote:

On June 26, 2007, IBM unveiled Blue Gene/P, the second generation of the Blue Gene supercomputer. Designed to run continuously at 1 PFLOPS (petaFLOPS), it can be configured to reach speeds in excess of 3 PFLOPS. Furthermore, it is at least seven times more energy efficient than any other supercomputer, accomplished by using many small, low-power chips connected through five specialized networks. Four 850 MHz PowerPC 450 processors are integrated on each Blue Gene/P chip. The 1-PFLOPS Blue Gene/P configuration is a 294,912-processor, 72-rack system harnessed to a high-speed, optical network. Blue Gene/P can be scaled to an 884,736-processor, 216-rack cluster to achieve 3-PFLOPS performance. A standard Blue Gene/P configuration will house 4,096 processors per rack. The first laboratory to receive the Blue Gene/P will be Argonne National Laboratory. The first racks of the Blue Gene/P will be shipped in fall 2007. The first installment will be a 111-teraflop system, which has approximately 32,000 processors, will be operational for the national community in spring 2008.

...

The last known supercomputer in the Blue Gene series, Blue Gene/Q is aimed to reach 10 PFLOPS in the 2010-2012 time frame. It will continue to expand and enhance the Blue Gene/L and /P architectures with higher frequency at similar performance/watt. Blue Gene/Q will have a similar number of nodes but many more cores per node.

Intel has been active in developing similar systems and I would not be the least bit surprised to see the new 8-core Pentium chips in a supercomputer near you in the not too distant future. Of course, not every supercomputer made gets advertised in the press.

tullio
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The BlueGene OS is a version

The BlueGene OS is a version of Linux. This is not much advertised.
Tullio

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