blown in insulation

robl
robl
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Topic 219339

This morning I had 8 inches of blown in fiberglass insulation added to what I already had in the attic.  Over the years the rolled in stuff had compressed and was not as effective.  Hopefully this "will" make a difference and if so I will put the other two towers back online without waiting for the cooler days of Florida weather.  I will have to give it a few days to adjust before I try anything.  On another note I really felt for the guys in the attic doing this kind of work.  Had it been me they would have had to cut me out.

mikey
mikey
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robl wrote:This morning I had

robl wrote:
This morning I had 8 inches of blown in fiberglass insulation added to what I already had in the attic.  Over the years the rolled in stuff had compressed and was not as effective.  Hopefully this "will" make a difference and if so I will put the other two towers back online without waiting for the cooler days of Florida weather.  I will have to give it a few days to adjust before I try anything.  On another note I really felt for the guys in the attic doing this kind of work.  Had it been me they would have had to cut me out.

WOO HOO!!! Do you already have the foil faced panels that are installed up against the plywood inside the attic? I have that here in NC and they say it helps alot, but it is still hot in my attic. I have a ridge vent on mine no fans and need to make sure the soffit vents stay clear so the air comes in them and out the ridge vent.

robl
robl
Joined: 2 Jan 13
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mikey wrote:robl wrote:This

mikey wrote:
robl wrote:
This morning I had 8 inches of blown in fiberglass insulation added to what I already had in the attic.  Over the years the rolled in stuff had compressed and was not as effective.  Hopefully this "will" make a difference and if so I will put the other two towers back online without waiting for the cooler days of Florida weather.  I will have to give it a few days to adjust before I try anything.  On another note I really felt for the guys in the attic doing this kind of work.  Had it been me they would have had to cut me out.

WOO HOO!!! Do you already have the foil faced panels that are installed up against the plywood inside the attic? I have that here in NC and they say it helps alot, but it is still hot in my attic. I have a ridge vent on mine no fans and need to make sure the soffit vents stay clear so the air comes in them and out the ridge vent.

my set up is  the same though I am not sure about the foil panels.  With a reroof they are now adding a solar powered exhaust system that pulls the heat out during the day rather then relying solely on the ridge vents alone.    

mikey
mikey
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Credit: 518,519,778
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robl wrote:mikey wrote:robl

robl wrote:
mikey wrote:
robl wrote:
This morning I had 8 inches of blown in fiberglass insulation added to what I already had in the attic.  Over the years the rolled in stuff had compressed and was not as effective.  Hopefully this "will" make a difference and if so I will put the other two towers back online without waiting for the cooler days of Florida weather.  I will have to give it a few days to adjust before I try anything.  On another note I really felt for the guys in the attic doing this kind of work.  Had it been me they would have had to cut me out.

WOO HOO!!! Do you already have the foil faced panels that are installed up against the plywood inside the attic? I have that here in NC and they say it helps alot, but it is still hot in my attic. I have a ridge vent on mine no fans and need to make sure the soffit vents stay clear so the air comes in them and out the ridge vent.

my set up is  the same though I am not sure about the foil panels.  With a reroof they are now adding a solar powered exhaust system that pulls the heat out during the day rather then relying solely on the ridge vents alone.    

That should make it cooler too!!

Zalster
Zalster
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I have the foil and the blow

I have the foil and the blow in.  If I could do it all over again, I would have put the solar powered air vent to the attic to help remove the hot air in there and instead of foil and blow in I would have had them use the insulating foam under the roof.  I've heard it's just as good as the foil, helps to keep water out of the attic if the roof is puncture by hail and just as good for keeping the house warm in winter.

mikey
mikey
Joined: 22 Jan 05
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Zalster wrote:I have the foil

Zalster wrote:
I have the foil and the blow in.  If I could do it all over again, I would have put the solar powered air vent to the attic to help remove the hot air in there and instead of foil and blow in I would have had them use the insulating foam under the roof.  I've heard it's just as good as the foil, helps to keep water out of the attic if the roof is puncture by hail and just as good for keeping the house warm in winter.

That's cool!!

I have a computer room and no 2nd floor on my house, just attic space so an thinking about putting an exhaust fan in my computer room to blow some of the hot air into the attic when it's cooler outside than inside that room. That may also cause a slight reduction in overall attic temps as the hot air will cause cooler air to be brought in under the eaves as the hot air goes thru the attic and out the ridge vent. It was  110F in the computer room the other day when the a/c units shut down due to a problem, which is now fixed and they are back down to their normal 82F.

robl
robl
Joined: 2 Jan 13
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mikey wrote:Zalster wrote:I

mikey wrote:
Zalster wrote:
I have the foil and the blow in.  If I could do it all over again, I would have put the solar powered air vent to the attic to help remove the hot air in there and instead of foil and blow in I would have had them use the insulating foam under the roof.  I've heard it's just as good as the foil, helps to keep water out of the attic if the roof is puncture by hail and just as good for keeping the house warm in winter.

That's cool!!

I have a computer room and no 2nd floor on my house, just attic space so an thinking about putting an exhaust fan in my computer room to blow some of the hot air into the attic when it's cooler outside than inside that room. That may also cause a slight reduction in overall attic temps as the hot air will cause cooler air to be brought in under the eaves as the hot air goes thru the attic and out the ridge vent. It was  110F in the computer room the other day when the a/c units shut down due to a problem, which is now fixed and they are back down to their normal 82F.

110F - ouch!!!

mikey
mikey
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 5,087
Credit: 518,519,778
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robl wrote:mikey

robl wrote:
mikey wrote:
Zalster wrote:
I have the foil and the blow in.  If I could do it all over again, I would have put the solar powered air vent to the attic to help remove the hot air in there and instead of foil and blow in I would have had them use the insulating foam under the roof.  I've heard it's just as good as the foil, helps to keep water out of the attic if the roof is puncture by hail and just as good for keeping the house warm in winter.

That's cool!!

I have a computer room and no 2nd floor on my house, just attic space so an thinking about putting an exhaust fan in my computer room to blow some of the hot air into the attic when it's cooler outside than inside that room. That may also cause a slight reduction in overall attic temps as the hot air will cause cooler air to be brought in under the eaves as the hot air goes thru the attic and out the ridge vent. It was  110F in the computer room the other day when the a/c units shut down due to a problem, which is now fixed and they are back down to their normal 82F.

110F - ouch!!!

Yes!!! I shut everything down and left the door open so the 90+F degree outside air could cool it off while I called the a/c folks. Fortunately they got most of it working again so in a few hours I was back up again. It's a small room with no in or out movement of the air, they say that's better for 'mini-split' units.

JStateson
JStateson
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mikey wrote:WOO HOO!!! Do you

mikey wrote:
WOO HOO!!! Do you already have the foil faced panels that are installed up against the plywood inside the attic? I have that here in NC and they say it helps alot, but it is still hot in my attic

I looked into that "radiant barrier" at a home improvement promotion.  One promoter claimed a reflective paint could be put on the inside surface of the plywood.  That is a lot cheaper and may well help.  All the research I did indicates a true radiant barrier needs a minimum 3 inch air gap between the back of the foil bubble and the plywood.

I have been reimbursed for hail damage but have not repaired the roof.  Once I get that done, and "IF" there are no leaks, the barrier will go in.  This will be DIY using material from Lowes during winter when it is cool in attic.   I don't remember if the reflective part faces the plywood or the blown in insulation.    Clearly the "spray" barrier faces the insulation but that is because it is a "spray".

mikey
mikey
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 5,087
Credit: 518,519,778
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JStateson wrote:mikey

JStateson wrote:
mikey wrote:
WOO HOO!!! Do you already have the foil faced panels that are installed up against the plywood inside the attic? I have that here in NC and they say it helps alot, but it is still hot in my attic

I looked into that "radiant barrier" at a home improvement promotion.  One promoter claimed a reflective paint could be put on the inside surface of the plywood.  That is a lot cheaper and may well help.  All the research I did indicates a true radiant barrier needs a minimum 3 inch air gap between the back of the foil bubble and the plywood.

I have been reimbursed for hail damage but have not repaired the roof.  Once I get that done, and "IF" there are no leaks, the barrier will go in.  This will be DIY using material from Lowes during winter when it is cool in attic.   I don't remember if the reflective part faces the plywood or the blown in insulation.    Clearly the "spray" barrier faces the insulation but that is because it is a "spray".

If I remember correctly the radiant side faces the plywood to reflect the heat back outside. And I have heard of a gap barrier between the panels and the plywood but never seen one actually used. The panels are pretty flexible so supporting them could be an issue. When building new homes in my area they put up the rafters then nail the plywood on, then the shingles then another group of guys go inside and attach the panels to the plywood from inside the roof when they blow in the insulation. But I've never seen them attach the panels so I don't know how they do it, and I haven't looked that closely at mine yet.

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