Animated movie about neutron stars, pulsars, and continuous gravitational waves

Join us on a journey into the depths of our Galaxy with an animated movie about neutron stars, pulsars, and continuous gravitational waves! This new video was created by Dr. M.A. Papa's research group that deploys the Einstein@Home gravitational wave searches. It will take you through our Galaxy to a very special type of star: a neutron star. Rapidly rotating neutron stars are the main target of Einstein@Home because of their continuous gravitational wave emission. Detecting these waves will be a new tool for astrophysical investigations. Enjoy the movie!

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neyel8r
neyel8r
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interesting, thanks!

interesting, thanks!

tullio
tullio
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In 1970 while at Mondadori

In 1970 while at Mondadori Publishing House I published and article by prof. Peter G.Bergmann on recent researches in General Relativity. His article ended with the prediction  that researches in General Relativuty would join researches in elementary particle physics to become the bleeding edge of physics. He was right.

YVETTE JONES
YVETTE JONES
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That is awesome this type of

That is awesome this type of information is well appreciated, it said that you learn something new everyday. and I just did thank you.

Thund3rb1rd
Thund3rb1rd
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Excellent work.  Thank

Excellent work.  Thank you.

 

Yochanon
Yochanon
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Fantastic! It's really nice

Fantastic! It's really nice to see the work of thousands of computers put into a 'visual' of the whole. Thank you very much for this video.

Ereignishorizont
Ereignishorizont
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Great video!   Which

Great video!

 

Which subproject of Einstein@home searches for those gravitational waves caused by the "hill" on the neutron star? Is it just the "O3 All Sky"-subproject or are there other ones?

Cameron
Cameron
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Oh I did enjoy the

Oh I did enjoy the movie.

Just wondering if the pulsars highlighted in the Milkyway were those that the project has discovered.

They were a nice extra visual touch at the conclusion of the movie.

Benjamin Knispel
Benjamin Knispel
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Cameron schrieb: Just

Cameron wrote:

Just wondering if the pulsars highlighted in the Milkyway were those that the project has discovered.

No, those pulsars were just added at scientifically plausible position that hat nothing to do with the Einstein@Home discoveries.

In fact, it can be quite hard to exactly determine the distance to pulsars, so the exact position is usually not known. For radio pulsars, the distance is usually determined from the amount of dispersion (high-frequency radio waves arrive earlier than low-freqency waves) in the received radio pulses. This dispersion tells us the summed free electron density along the line of sight. Models of this electron density in our Galaxy then allow us to estimate the distance. But since these models have uncertainties the distances can also be off by tens of percent.

 

Einstein@Home Project

Vic Sergeev
Vic Sergeev
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I'm very glad to participate

I'm very glad to participate in this research, thank you for giving a chance for us to be a part of it, and personally from me for giving to my old laptop second life

Vic the Geek

Paolo Veronesi [FVG]
Paolo Veronesi [FVG]
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Very interesting this video

Very interesting this video on the operation and explanation of a pulsar!!!

stregg
stregg
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I would like to know if there

I would like to know if there is an algorithm that allows scientist to know what the range of a gravitational wave is. I was just thinking: (I am a merchant mariner. I see the size of a water wave is in direct proportion to the size of an object, the speed it is moving, and the distance it travels before being cancelled out by the other wind waves, currents, and other waves). I am wondering if gravitational waves do the same thing. I would assume so. Space is dynamic, not static. Just curious. I did not even graduate from Highschool but love the science and knowledge. I just suck at math and formulas beyond the basics. Shoot, I got a "D" in geometry and Algebra 2 back in High School.

V/r

Stregg

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