All things RX 500 series (460/560/570/580)

Jim1348
Jim1348
Joined: 19 Jan 06
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Well I tried.  I built a new

Well I tried.  I built a new Ryzen 3600 machine, and thought I would put in at least one, and maybe both, of my RX 570's.  But I committed the crime of installing Ubuntu 20.04.2, and of course the AMD drivers do not work with the recent Linux kernels.  Maybe they will get it working someday, but the card will be obsolete by then.

And even if you do get a working version, the next Ubuntu update will kill it.  So that means Nvidia.  The drivers for my old GTX 750Ti showed up right away.  

 

robl
robl
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Jim1348 wrote:Well I

Jim1348 wrote:

Well I tried.  I built a new Ryzen 3600 machine, and thought I would put in at least one, and maybe both, of my RX 570's.  But I committed the crime of installing Ubuntu 20.04.2, and of course the AMD drivers do not work with the recent Linux kernels.  Maybe they will get it working someday, but the card will be obsolete by then.

And even if you do get a working version, the next Ubuntu update will kill it.  So that means Nvidia.  The drivers for my old GTX 750Ti showed up right away.  

 

Jim,

I too ran into the same problem.  Short version:  

  1. Install ubuntu 20.04.2
  2. Install an older kernel
  3. reboot to the older kernel.
  4. install the AMD drivers.
  5. remove the newer kernels
  6. join E@H

You can read the detailed procedure here.

Be careful with the "sudo ./amdgpu-install -y –opencl=pal,legacy" 

command with cut/paste.  there are two dashes before the opencl and I have had this not be recognized.  

if it goes wrong then unistall the drivers with:  amdgpu-pro-uninstall and try again.  

Some will say that "pal,legacy" not supported but with kernel 5.4.0.54 it seemed necessary.  you can view my list of computers and "see" that computer 6633 properly ids the GPU

EDIT:  you are correct in your assessment about upgrading - dont do it.

Jim1348
Jim1348
Joined: 19 Jan 06
Posts: 458
Credit: 233,122,964
RAC: 430

robl wrote:Install an older

robl wrote:

Install an older kernel

  1. reboot to the older kernel.
  2. install the AMD drivers.
  3. remove the newer kernels
  4. join E@H

Thanks, I have seen that remedy mentioned.  But my experience with changing Linux kernels is that it is a fate worse than death.


I will stay with the GTX 750 Ti and do the new WCG/OPNG.  The results of the beta are very promising.

mmonnin
mmonnin
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robl wrote: Jim1348

robl wrote:

Jim1348 wrote:

Well I tried.  I built a new Ryzen 3600 machine, and thought I would put in at least one, and maybe both, of my RX 570's.  But I committed the crime of installing Ubuntu 20.04.2, and of course the AMD drivers do not work with the recent Linux kernels.  Maybe they will get it working someday, but the card will be obsolete by then.

And even if you do get a working version, the next Ubuntu update will kill it.  So that means Nvidia.  The drivers for my old GTX 750Ti showed up right away.  

 

Jim,

I too ran into the same problem.  Short version:  

  1. Install ubuntu 20.04.2
  2. Install an older kernel
  3. reboot to the older kernel.
  4. install the AMD drivers.
  5. remove the newer kernels
  6. join E@H

You can read the detailed procedure here.

Be careful with the "sudo ./amdgpu-install -y –opencl=pal,legacy" 

command with cut/paste.  there are two dashes before the opencl and I have had this not be recognized.  

if it goes wrong then unistall the drivers with:  amdgpu-pro-uninstall and try again.  

Some will say that "pal,legacy" not supported but with kernel 5.4.0.54 it seemed necessary.  you can view my list of computers and "see" that computer 6633 properly ids the GPU

EDIT:  you are correct in your assessment about upgrading - dont do it.

 

Well that's the most detailed instructions I've seen. I had tried awhile back but ended up just going back to 18.04 and abandoning an AMD card. No Vbox issues with 18.04 either. It's pretty sad that the instructions that come with the driver are incorrect.

Tom M
Tom M
Joined: 2 Feb 06
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Jim1348 wrote:Well I tried. 

Jim1348 wrote:

Well I tried.  I built a new Ryzen 3600 machine, and thought I would put in at least one, and maybe both, of my RX 570's.  But I committed the crime of installing Ubuntu 20.04.2, and of course the AMD drivers do not work with the recent Linux kernels.  Maybe they will get it working someday, but the card will be obsolete by then.

And even if you do get a working version, the next Ubuntu update will kill it.  So that means Nvidia.  The drivers for my old GTX 750Ti showed up right away.  

Jim,

The least complicated way to get AMD drivers working on Ubuntu 20 is to install the OS without the network plugged in.  Your goal is to NOT allow any updates past what is on the distribution.  If you want to do it with the network plugged in then make sure you don't allow any updates/extra drivers etc. during the install.

This means you end up with Kermel 5.4 which will allow the AMD drivers to be installed.

Once you have the drivers installed you can allow Ubuntu to be updated and so far nothing has been broken by the updates (at least as far as the drivers are concerned).

If/when the Ubuntu 20 LTS install stops coming with kernel 5.4 some other workaround will be needed.  Or the presenting problem with the kernel and/or driver script will need to be fixed.

Tom M

Live long and Prosper.

A proud member of the O.F.A. (Old Farts Association)

It ain't the heat it's the humility. - Yogi Berra

 

Jim1348
Jim1348
Joined: 19 Jan 06
Posts: 458
Credit: 233,122,964
RAC: 430

Tom M wrote:The least

Tom M wrote:
The least complicated way to get AMD drivers working on Ubuntu 20 is to install the OS without the network plugged in.  Your goal is to NOT allow any updates past what is on the distribution.  If you want to do it with the network plugged in then make sure you don't allow any updates/extra drivers etc. during the install.

Thanks.  That looks painless and foolproof, which is unusual with Linux.

Maybe I can give it a try, though not at the moment.

 

Jim1348
Jim1348
Joined: 19 Jan 06
Posts: 458
Credit: 233,122,964
RAC: 430

mmonnin wrote: Jim, I too

mmonnin wrote:

Jim,

I too ran into the same problem.  Short version:  

  1. Install ubuntu 20.04.2
  2. Install an older kernel
  3. reboot to the older kernel.
  4. install the AMD drivers.
  5. remove the newer kernels
  6. join E@H

You can read the detailed procedure here.

Be careful with the "sudo ./amdgpu-install -y –opencl=pal,legacy" 

command with cut/paste.  there are two dashes before the opencl and I have had this not be recognized.  

if it goes wrong then unistall the drivers with:  amdgpu-pro-uninstall and try again.  

I want to thank you more fully for writing that up.  I realized that I did not have much to lose by trying it before having to reinstall the OS, and it finally worked.  As usual, there were some additional hoops to jump through, which may be of some use to others, though I don't know if they are usually necessary.

  1. There are usually "broken packages" with AMD and Ubuntu, so first thing is to boot into grub, select advanced options, and do the broken packages fix before attempting the update.
  2. I still managed to get an error message on the install, but there was one I had not seen before about an incompatible operating system.  So I did another kernel downgrade (sudo apt remove linux-image-5.4.0-54-generic linux-image-unsigned-5.4.0-54-generic), and then installed 5.4.0-52 (sudo apt install linux-image-5.4.0-52-generic linux-headers-5.4.0-52-generic linux-modules-extra-5.4.0-52-generic).
  3. That seemed to fix the install problem, but upon reboot BOINC still said that "no useable gpu found".  That is curious.  But I remembered the old trick of rebooting again to fix driver problems, and viola!, it worked.  (Maybe it was because I previously had an Nvidia card installed).
  4. I now am running GW fine.  It is a nice speedup.
  5. Thanks again. 
robl
robl
Joined: 2 Jan 13
Posts: 1,706
Credit: 1,423,696,396
RAC: 2,745

Jim1348 wrote: mmonnin

Jim1348 wrote:

mmonnin wrote:

Jim,

I too ran into the same problem.  Short version:  

  1. Install ubuntu 20.04.2
  2. Install an older kernel
  3. reboot to the older kernel.
  4. install the AMD drivers.
  5. remove the newer kernels
  6. join E@H

You can read the detailed procedure here.

Be careful with the "sudo ./amdgpu-install -y –opencl=pal,legacy" 

command with cut/paste.  there are two dashes before the opencl and I have had this not be recognized.  

if it goes wrong then unistall the drivers with:  amdgpu-pro-uninstall and try again.  

I want to thank you more fully for writing that up.  I realized that I did not have much to lose by trying it before having to reinstall the OS, and it finally worked.  As usual, there were some additional hoops to jump through, which may be of some use to others, though I don't know if they are usually necessary.

  1. There are usually "broken packages" with AMD and Ubuntu, so first thing is to boot into grub, select advanced options, and do the broken packages fix before attempting the update.
  2. I still managed to get an error message on the install, but there was one I had not seen before about an incompatible operating system.  So I did another kernel downgrade (sudo apt remove linux-image-5.4.0-54-generic linux-image-unsigned-5.4.0-54-generic), and then installed 5.4.0-52 (sudo apt install linux-image-5.4.0-52-generic linux-headers-5.4.0-52-generic linux-modules-extra-5.4.0-52-generic).
  3. That seemed to fix the install problem, but upon reboot BOINC still said that "no useable gpu found".  That is curious.  But I remembered the old trick of rebooting again to fix driver problems, and viola!, it worked.  (Maybe it was because I previously had an Nvidia card installed).
  4. I now am running GW fine.  It is a nice speedup.
  5. Thanks again. 

Jim,

I feel like I have spent a lifetime getting AMD drivers installed on Ubuntu 20.  I have had errors with "pin" package not being found and with HWE issues.  I tried Tom's suggestion about not plugging in the network during installation and this made a difference in that the kernel did not get updated.  Anyway you got it working and so did I so the outcome for the both of us is a "+".  

Jim1348
Jim1348
Joined: 19 Jan 06
Posts: 458
Credit: 233,122,964
RAC: 430

robl wrote:Anyway you got it

robl wrote:
Anyway you got it working and so did I so the outcome for the both of us is a "+".  

It is an exclusive club.

cecht
cecht
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Just to follow up on the AMD

Just to follow up on the AMD vs Ubuntu 20.04.2 Linux kernel problem, I too ran into all the headaches described here, but found something that works with the newest kernels when I do upgrades.  Actually, every time I do a 20.04.2 system update that includes a kernel upgrade I have to reinstall the AMD drivers to be able to use rickslab-gpu-utils to control the GPU. Hmm, this is getting far afield from the OP, but I'll forge on...

This is my winning sequence (use sudo when needed):

$ /usr/bin/amdgpu-uninstall

then from with the latest AMD driver directory,

$ ./amdgpu-install -y --opencl=rocr,legacy --headless --no-dkms

then reboot.

The trick for me was the --no-dkms option, which, I vaguely recall, Keith Myers mentioned somewhere sometime. The installation script still appears to use dkms, so I don't really know what's going on, but it works. I use --headless because the mesa drivers native to the kernel work fine for me.

AMD now uses ROCr runtime for AMDGPU drivers on the new generation cards, so 'pal' is just an installer alias for 'rocr'. This, from https://github.com/RadeonOpenCompute/ROCR-Runtime: "The HSA runtime is a thin, user-mode API that exposes the necessary interfaces to access and interact with graphics hardware driven by the AMDGPU driver set and the ROCK kernel driver. Together they enable programmers to directly harness the power of AMD discrete graphics devices by allowing host applications to launch compute kernels directly to the graphics hardware."

I'm currently only running a RX5600 XT (further afield!) because my RX570 machine is off-line, but all the  above holds true for RX 5xx cards.

 

Ideas are not fixed, nor should they be; we live in model-dependent reality.

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