Poweroptimized Crunching boxes

Winterknight
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This article at Toms Hardware

This article at Toms Hardware maybe of interest, it discusses power consumption with onboard graphics and using graphics cards. Dual Core Intel Processors For Low-Power, High-Performance Desktops and compares them to the AMD's Turion 64.

Andy

_heinz
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here you can see the results

here you can see the results of this article at Toms Hardware
thanks Andy

_heinz
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Now I have my IDE to CF

Now I have my IDE to CF Adaptor. It has some interesting parts
JP1: CF POWER SOURCE
1-2: External
2-3: IDE Pin-20

JP2: CF SUPPLY VOLTAGE
1-2: +5V
2-3: +3,3V

J3: MODE SELECT
1-2: Master/Single
2-3: Slave

further it has 3 LED´s
LED1 yellow -->Card detect
LED2 green -->Activity
LED3 red -->Power

Now I still need a fast SD-Card, think 2GB is big enough for a LINUX or WINXP
Then can I start the experiment :-)

Annika
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This is a bit crazy ^^ but

This is a bit crazy ^^ but it's interesting... I'm using my laptop to crunch, though I'm not sure how much energy it actually consumes. I'd be interested in finding out, how does one do that? When it's plugged in, it's supposed to get around 70 Watts but then it would still be recharging its battery so I guess it actually needs less...
I'm not into building boxes for Einstein only (maybe when I'm earning a bit more money ;-)) but I'm interested in how your experiments turn out, so don't forget to post about the results here.

_heinz
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RE: Now I have my IDE to CF

Message 41008 in response to message 41006

Quote:

Now I have my IDE to CF Adaptor. It has some interesting parts
JP1: CF POWER SOURCE
1-2: External
2-3: IDE Pin-20

JP2: CF SUPPLY VOLTAGE
1-2: +5V
2-3: +3,3V

J3: MODE SELECT
1-2: Master/Single
2-3: Slave

further it has 3 LED´s
LED1 yellow -->Card detect
LED2 green -->Activity
LED3 red -->Power

Now I still need a fast SD-Card, think 2GB is big enough for a LINUX or WINXP
Then can I start the experiment :-)


edit:
Device Support: CF(Type I & II) and Micro-drive
Driver: Driverless
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jim-R
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RE: This is a bit crazy ^^

Message 41009 in response to message 41007

Quote:
This is a bit crazy ^^ but it's interesting... I'm using my laptop to crunch, though I'm not sure how much energy it actually consumes. I'd be interested in finding out, how does one do that? When it's plugged in, it's supposed to get around 70 Watts but then it would still be recharging its battery so I guess it actually needs less...
I'm not into building boxes for Einstein only (maybe when I'm earning a bit more money ;-)) but I'm interested in how your experiments turn out, so don't forget to post about the results here.


To check the power consumption within a reasonable amount (of course also counting power consumed as a loss by the converter/charger) simply leave the computer connected to the adapter for several times the amount of time normally taken to recharge the battery. This would insure that the battery is really fully charged and "topped off". Then measure the power consumption. Next turn the computer off and measure the power consumption. Subtract the second figure from the first and this will give you an estimate of the actual power used by the computer. The reason for the second measurement is to allow for losses in the power adapter/charger and also allow for the trickle charging current going to the battery.
Hope this helps.

When asked a question and you are not sure of the right answer, I've found that the best answer is always "I don't know for sure, but I'll find out!"

RandyC
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I don't use laptops, so maybe

Message 41010 in response to message 41009

I don't use laptops, so maybe this is a stupid question, but...Why not just remove the batteries and make your measurements that way?

[edit typo]

Quote:
Quote:
This is a bit crazy ^^ but it's interesting... I'm using my laptop to crunch, though I'm not sure how much energy it actually consumes. I'd be interested in finding out, how does one do that? When it's plugged in, it's supposed to get around 70 Watts but then it would still be recharging its battery so I guess it actually needs less...
I'm not into building boxes for Einstein only (maybe when I'm earning a bit more money ;-)) but I'm interested in how your experiments turn out, so don't forget to post about the results here.

To check the power consumption within a reasonable amount (of course also counting power consumed as a loss by the converter/charger) simply leave the computer connected to the adapter for several times the amount of time normally taken to recharge the battery. This would insure that the battery is really fully charged and "topped off". Then measure the power consumption. Next turn the computer off and measure the power consumption. Subtract the second figure from the first and this will give you an estimate of the actual power used by the computer. The reason for the second measurement is to allow for losses in the power adapter/charger and also allow for the trickle charging current going to the battery.
Hope this helps.


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Pooh Bear 27
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RE: I don't use laptops, so

Message 41011 in response to message 41010

Quote:
I don't use laptops, so maybe this is a stupid question, but...Why not just remove the batteries and make your measurements that way?


Believe it or not, some laptops will not run if the batteries are not plugged in. It filters through the battery to give constant power to the machine. Not all do this, but I have seen several. Although, come to think of it, not many of the newer ones do this, if any. Older ones did.

Jim-R
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RE: I don't use laptops, so

Message 41012 in response to message 41010

Quote:

I don't use laptops, so maybe this is a stupid question, but...Why not just remove the batteries and make your measurements that way?

[edit typo]

Quote:
Quote:
This is a bit crazy ^^ but it's interesting... I'm using my laptop to crunch, though I'm not sure how much energy it actually consumes. I'd be interested in finding out, how does one do that? When it's plugged in, it's supposed to get around 70 Watts but then it would still be recharging its battery so I guess it actually needs less...
I'm not into building boxes for Einstein only (maybe when I'm earning a bit more money ;-)) but I'm interested in how your experiments turn out, so don't forget to post about the results here.

To check the power consumption within a reasonable amount (of course also counting power consumed as a loss by the converter/charger) simply leave the computer connected to the adapter for several times the amount of time normally taken to recharge the battery. This would insure that the battery is really fully charged and "topped off". Then measure the power consumption. Next turn the computer off and measure the power consumption. Subtract the second figure from the first and this will give you an estimate of the actual power used by the computer. The reason for the second measurement is to allow for losses in the power adapter/charger and also allow for the trickle charging current going to the battery.
Hope this helps.

First, it may be like PoohBear said that it won't run without the batteries. (I had an older IBM Thinkpad 550c that would.) But you would still be measuring the power loss in the adapter. This is fine if you want the total consumption, but if you want an accurate measurement of the computer itself, you must measure both ways and subtract the difference. Of course if you are technically minded and can do it properly, you could connect a circuit in the battery leads and measure directly the current drawn from the battery. The simplest circuit would be simply a small value high power resistor in the battery lead and measure the voltage drop across it. Using ohms law you can come up with the actual current drawn and the power used. But this is not recommended due to possible damage to your computer if you are not completely positive about your electronic abilities, not to mention it may void the warranty if you have to cut a wire to splice the detecting circuit in.

When asked a question and you are not sure of the right answer, I've found that the best answer is always "I don't know for sure, but I'll find out!"

RandyC
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RE: First, it may be like

Message 41013 in response to message 41012

Quote:

First, it may be like PoohBear said that it won't run without the batteries. (I had an older IBM Thinkpad 550c that would.) But you would still be measuring the power loss in the adapter. This is fine if you want the total consumption, but if you want an accurate measurement of the computer itself, you must measure both ways and subtract the difference.

Ok...A few more questions (although, other than curiosity, I'm not sure why I care. I don't have a laptop, and don't intend to ever get one).

If you crunch 24/7, you'll probably have the adaptor plugged in 24/7 (or a major portion of that time anyway) so you want to measure its usage (power loss) as well.

If you only crunch when on battery...well you have to recharge anyway, so you should account for adapter loss that way as well. Regardless, if you run off the battery, how do you measure power usage with/without the science app running? (This is a technical question, not philosophical or sarcastic).

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