Plans for near future of E@H ?

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
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RE: RE: That's called

Quote:
Quote:
That's called deja poo : ' strong sensation that an event or experience currently being experienced is crappy and down to you'. :-)

lol - There may yet be be some science in this... deja poo-ness is translational invariant, it decreases with distance from the event, both in time and distance. So is there a conservation law?


Personally I think we are tapping into the Universe's zero-point energy here. So yes, it is true that the Universe really does hate us.

[ If that is not a Theory Of Everything candidate then I don't know what is. :-) ]

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Bernd Machenschalk
Bernd Machenschalk
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RE: Thank you Bernd. Good

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Thank you Bernd. Good things come to those who wait. :-)

Well, for us this has been an extremely "busy waiting".

BM

BM

Mike Hewson
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RE: RE: Thank you Bernd.

Quote:
Quote:
Thank you Bernd. Good things come to those who wait. :-)

Well, for us this has been an extremely "busy waiting".


Ah. Hardware status polling via wetware interrupts then.

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Filipe
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From February

From February 2015:

Quote:

When we planned and conducted this first analysis we where limited by the available computing power on Einstein@Home, which at that time forced us to limit our search to pulsars spinning with at most 130 Hz. Searching for faster spinning pulsars in binaries requires more templates, and the dependence on the spin frequency is pretty steep (f^3 for the experts). In the concluding paragraphs of the publication we speculated on what kind of searches we might be able to do in the future, assuming the usual (Moore's law) growth in computing power over time. Extrapolating from the computing power and apps back the we estimated that within a decade we would be able to re-do our analysis and search up to 250 Hz.

Here we are, a bit more than four years after the start of the BRP3 PMPS search. Improvements in the Nvidia BRP GPU apps and the development of an ATI/AMD GPU app allow us to already now extend our search range up to pulsar spin frequencies of 300 Hz. And that is precisely what BRP6 will do. With your help we will re-analyze the PMPS data and look for faster spinning pulsars in tight binary systems. Scientifically speaking, this is very interesting territority: fast-spinning (millisecond) pulsars in short-orbital-period binaries are an extremely exciting class of astronomical objects. One can do precise tests of general relativity with them, study stellar evolution, and get a more complete picture of the pulsar population in our Galaxy.

The PMPS data set still is quite large with over 41,000 individual observations. At the current computing power it would take about three years to conduct this very thorough analysis that nobody has ever done before. During this time, however, if the available computing power keeps growing as expected, the actual time to completion will be less.

Thank you for your support, keep on crunching,
Benjamin

One year later we are 60% done. Is there some preliminary results?

Fellow crunchers, can we finish this search in the next 6 months? (Half the time initially estimated?)

DanNeely
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O1AS20-100I is only a few

O1AS20-100I is only a few days from being finished, while the F search has a month to go. Will the next batch of GW data be started for lower end systems in the next few days; or will they all be falling back on FGRP tasks for a while?

Bernd Machenschalk
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We are urgently working on

We are urgently working on preparing the next search for continuous gravitational waves, but aren't finished with that yet.

For now, the "low end systems" (well, CPUs with smaller cache size) will run the gamma-ray pulsar search, as will the others until the new search is ready to launch.

BM

BM

Bernd Machenschalk
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Answering a question from

Answering a question from "Technical news" here, as it is probably of general interest:

Jasper_7 wrote:

Does that mean that Einstein will be GPU only from then on? Or will there be a new Gravitational Wave search before?

The search for Gravitational Waves will remain the core business of Einstein@Home.

We are currently preparing a new search for Continuous GW in O1 data, but are still fighting to get rid of glitches and artifacts in the pre-processed data. This search will be the last to use a variant of the "Global Correllation" code, essentially the same application that we used for O1AS.

For the next CW searches we are working on a new, more flexible code called "Weave". Of this code we will then make a GPU version, too.

We are also working on porting a search to E@H that will look for the type of GWs that were detected first. This will at some point feature a GPU version, but probably CUDA/NVidia only.

The most likely scenario for the Gamma-Ray pulsar search is that we will have different types of workunits for CPU and GPU apps, similar to the Radio-Pulsar search in Arecibo data (BRP4(G)).

BM

Jasper
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Thank you for taking the time

Thank you for taking the time Bernd!

I´m looking forward to whatever the future will bring.

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