Living on Mars

Solomon
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One way to significantly cut

One way to significantly cut the fuel cost of a Mars mission would be to produce the fuel for the return trip in situ. At minimum, Mars' atmosphere contains enough CO2 to get the necessary Oxygen.

For significant elaboration on this, you might want to check out Robert Zubrin' The Case for Mars.

tullio
tullio
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RE: One way to

Message 26503 in response to message 26502

Quote:

One way to significantly cut the fuel cost of a Mars mission would be to produce the fuel for the return trip in situ. At minimum, Mars' atmosphere contains enough CO2 to get the necessary Oxygen.

For significant elaboration on this, you might want to check out Robert Zubrin' The Case for Mars.


Whatever technology we might use, what more could we learn from a manned mission to Mars than what we are already learning from the rovers and orbiters? I have watched a video from Caltech about the MARSIS radar measurements of ice on the south polar cap. Absolutely fascinating.
Tullio

ghstwolf
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RE: Whatever technology we

Message 26504 in response to message 26503

Quote:
Whatever technology we might use, what more could we learn from a manned mission to Mars than what we are already learning from the rovers and orbiters? I have watched a video from Caltech about the MARSIS radar measurements of ice on the south polar cap. Absolutely fascinating.
Tullio

What can we learn about Mars from a manned mission (rather than probes), very likely nothing. What can we learn from a manned mission to mars, an absolute ton. Nevermind the options a functional complex (able to handle complex manufacturing) on Mars would represent.

Make no mistake, I doubt there would be much "Science" involved in this learning. It would be more like Columbus or Magellan, more about logistics and developing "best practices" for even longer (further) missions. There will of course be a lot of research into materials, construction methods, and propulsion, so there will be science involved, maybe just not of the types you seem interested in.

I lean toward a mission profile heavy on setting up shop on Mars. A pioneer mission, where we bring what we need to build a permanent base. I'd go (if I was a canidate) on such a startup mission in a second. That it is dangerous, and even knowing the 14-18 hr days of work (6 days a week), would be no deterent for me.


Chipper Q
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I think Tullio's right about

I think Tullio's right about being able to do the science remotely, but the following couple points are plain facts:

Mars, the Moon, Enceladus and the others, are there every bit as much as Everest,
And we are human. :)

tullio
tullio
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RE: I think Tullio's right

Message 26506 in response to message 26505

Quote:

I think Tullio's right about being able to do the science remotely, but the following couple points are plain facts:

Mars, the Moon, Enceladus and the others, are there every bit as much as Everest,
And we are human. :)


I never tried to climb Everest, but I tried to climb both Mount Blanc and Cervino (a.k.a. Matterhorn). And I had to go back every time. Sometimes it takes more courage to stop and turn back than to go forward. Happy Easter.
Tullio

Erik
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An article on a design for an

An article on a design for an antimatter spaceship for Mars missions: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/exploration/mmb/antimatter_spaceship.html

ghstwolf
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RE: I never tried to climb

Message 26508 in response to message 26506

Quote:
I never tried to climb Everest, but I tried to climb both Mount Blanc and Cervino (a.k.a. Matterhorn). And I had to go back every time. Sometimes it takes more courage to stop and turn back than to go forward. Happy Easter.
Tullio

You are right about having the courage to fail but escape alive. However, I disagree about where we are in those regards. I look to Mars as a shelter, giving us a better chance of survival. Failure isn't a long term solution, failing to get "out there" is death. We have nowhere to fall back to, Earth is it.

Are we ready??? No, but no one ever is. The only way to be ready is to get to gettin'.

Under perilous conditions- with small hope of success- they left behind the lives that they once led- and by virtue of their fortitude and single-minded strength- they cleared the way for the people of today- so when we think back to our ancestors- respectfully we hark- and thank the men whose struggle broke the chain- it's a long road up ahead of us - let's forge on while we're strong and leave our mark of honor once again- Dropkick Murphy's "Heroes of Our Past"


Steve
Steve
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RE: I think Tullio's right

Message 26509 in response to message 26505

Quote:

I think Tullio's right about being able to do the science remotely, but the following couple points are plain facts:

Mars, the Moon, Enceladus and the others, are there every bit as much as Everest,
And we are human. :)


Amen! If you believe the human race will always and forever be only on earth, the exploring is a waste of time, but if you believe otherwise, we have to start somewhere. Mars is pretty close.

tullio
tullio
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RE: Amen! If you believe

Message 26510 in response to message 26509

Quote:
Amen! If you believe the human race will always and forever be only on earth, the exploring is a waste of time, but if you believe otherwise, we have to start somewhere. Mars is pretty close.


The Moon is closer and the sunlight is much stronger on the Moon than on Mars. And sunlight means power.
Tullio

Andreas
Andreas
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The NASA Institute for

The NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts is funding a study on antimatter propulsion. Positronics Research, LLC, of Santa Fe, is working on how to send a spacecraft to Mars in 90 days or less, using just a few milligrams of positrons!

Read more here

Click my stat image to go to the BOINC Synergy Team site!

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