How do I get the internet with Linux?

mikey
mikey
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George wrote: mikey

George wrote:

mikey wrote:

Linux Mint does not use 3rd party drivers for the wired net, something went wrong during  the install and it is fixed this time around. The 3rd party drivers primarily refer to motherboard and gpu drivers, it could refer to wireless internet drivers but you said you are using a wired connection.

As a hint try right clicking on the Boinc Manager icon and sending it to the desktop instead of having it load automatically on bootup, sometimes on bootup it can hang and never actually load. On the desktop you can double click it and it will run just fine. Also unlike Windows if you close Boinc, not minimise EXIT Boinc, then you either have to type some command line stuff or reboot so don't do that too often. In Linux exiting does not close out everything and it will NOT startup again if you don't do the command line stuff or reboot.

As a good thing I have not had to reboot my Linux Mint machines in well over a couple of months. I  do not use my Linux machines for anything except crunching, Win10 has messed them up too often with all their new stuff and they are not new machines, they are working and to me that's what's  important.

I'm not sure exactly what happened, but it's working fine for me now so I'll leave it alone unless it does something I don't like, or not understand.  As I've indicated before, this is a 10+ yr old PC with a few up grades, like GPU, PSU, and SSD.

Now I'm having troubles downloading BOINC Manager and getting it to launch in Linux Mint v19.3.  How do I auto-start BOINC Manager in Linux Mint?

EDIT:

I understand that I need to use a package manager, but I don't know what/how to do that.

EDIT #2:

Ok, now I've found what I've been looking for.  I used the terminal and installed BOINC Manager using the Linux Debian package script, and low and behold... it's in my Administration Folder.

Thanks for all who helped me, and I hope some others who are reading this (albeit silently) can learn a bit from this too.

If you scroll thru the list of 'all' you will see 2 package installers, one is the Mint on and one is the one I use which is Synaptic and I like it lots better. If you put Boinc in the search box, click search it will show up in a list of stuff needed for Boinc. When you click on the Boinc Manager it will say 'you need these things too' click ok and go thru the list of other things you want, ie virtual box for Boinc, the ATI or Nvidia drivers etc etc. As you click things you want added and then click ok to add stuff you will see more of the boxes already checked for you. When you are done, you do NOT need everything and yes some things are unknowns at this point so you can skip or add them it's up to you, I skipped things that didn't make any sense...ie lots of libraries that were unchecked, and Boinc runs just fine for me. When you are done checking all the stuff you want click Apply up top and say yes to install everything, it will do it, do not just download click ok to install, and then it will say it's done. Then Boinc will be on your 'all' list.

I realize you've already gotten it working but that's how I do it on my Linux Mint pc's, I don't think I'd undo what you've already done since it is working for you but it's something you can look for next time you want to add something. I did a right click on the Synaptic package installer and now have it on the desktop as a link.

GWGeorge007
GWGeorge007
Joined: 8 Jan 18
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mikey wrote: George

mikey wrote:

George wrote:

mikey wrote:

Linux Mint does not use 3rd party drivers for the wired net, something went wrong during  the install and it is fixed this time around. The 3rd party drivers primarily refer to motherboard and gpu drivers, it could refer to wireless internet drivers but you said you are using a wired connection.

As a hint try right clicking on the Boinc Manager icon and sending it to the desktop instead of having it load automatically on bootup, sometimes on bootup it can hang and never actually load. On the desktop you can double click it and it will run just fine. Also unlike Windows if you close Boinc, not minimise EXIT Boinc, then you either have to type some command line stuff or reboot so don't do that too often. In Linux exiting does not close out everything and it will NOT startup again if you don't do the command line stuff or reboot.

As a good thing I have not had to reboot my Linux Mint machines in well over a couple of months. I  do not use my Linux machines for anything except crunching, Win10 has messed them up too often with all their new stuff and they are not new machines, they are working and to me that's what's  important.

Thank you Mikey for sharing your experience with downloading Linux Mint.  I'll definitely give it a try next time I need or want to get something for my computer.

I'm not sure exactly what happened, but it's working fine for me now so I'll leave it alone unless it does something I don't like, or not understand.  As I've indicated before, this is a 10+ yr old PC with a few up grades, like GPU, PSU, and SSD.

Now I'm having troubles downloading BOINC Manager and getting it to launch in Linux Mint v19.3.  How do I auto-start BOINC Manager in Linux Mint?

EDIT:

I understand that I need to use a package manager, but I don't know what/how to do that.

EDIT #2:

Ok, now I've found what I've been looking for.  I used the terminal and installed BOINC Manager using the Linux Debian package script, and low and behold... it's in my Administration Folder.

Thanks for all who helped me, and I hope some others who are reading this (albeit silently) can learn a bit from this too.

If you scroll thru the list of 'all' you will see 2 package installers, one is the Mint on and one is the one I use which is Synaptic and I like it lots better. If you put Boinc in the search box, click search it will show up in a list of stuff needed for Boinc. When you click on the Boinc Manager it will say 'you need these things too' click ok and go thru the list of other things you want, ie virtual box for Boinc, the ATI or Nvidia drivers etc etc. As you click things you want added and then click ok to add stuff you will see more of the boxes already checked for you. When you are done, you do NOT need everything and yes some things are unknowns at this point so you can skip or add them it's up to you, I skipped things that didn't make any sense...ie lots of libraries that were unchecked, and Boinc runs just fine for me. When you are done checking all the stuff you want click Apply up top and say yes to install everything, it will do it, do not just download click ok to install, and then it will say it's done. Then Boinc will be on your 'all' list.

I realize you've already gotten it working but that's how I do it on my Linux Mint pc's, I don't think I'd undo what you've already done since it is working for you but it's something you can look for next time you want to add something. I did a right click on the Synaptic package installer and now have it on the desktop as a link.

Thank you Mikey for sharing your experience with Linux Mint.  I'll definitely give the Synaptic package installer a try the next time I want or need something for my Linux Mint machine.

George

Proud member of the Old Farts Association

Keith Myers
Keith Myers
Joined: 11 Feb 11
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Adding the Synaptic Package

Adding the Synaptic Package Manager is the first thing I do after installing Linux.  It has many features that the command line use of apt does not do.

For one thing it shows the dependencies a prospective application you are thinking of installing requires and whether that will impact your existing applications.

 

mikey
mikey
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 11,740
Credit: 1,821,546,603
RAC: 855,075

Keith Myers wrote: Adding

Keith Myers wrote:

Adding the Synaptic Package Manager is the first thing I do after installing Linux.  It has many features that the command line use of apt does not do.

For one thing it shows the dependencies a prospective application you are thinking of installing requires and whether that will impact your existing applications.

The good thing is it comes built-in in Linux Mint.

Keith Myers
Keith Myers
Joined: 11 Feb 11
Posts: 4,648
Credit: 17,299,341,110
RAC: 6,980,775

Good to know Mike.  Ubuntu

Good to know Mikey.  Ubuntu should do the same.

 

robl
robl
Joined: 2 Jan 13
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Credit: 1,453,936,215
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Keith Myers wrote:Good to

Keith Myers wrote:

Good to know Mikey.  Ubuntu should do the same.

If you are running Ubuntu then click on the 3 dot matrix at the bottom of the "favorites bar.  At the top of that page in the search window type "syn".  You can then use the synaptic manager by clicking on the managers icon and providing root password.  If you right click on the icon you can "add" it to the favorites bar.  

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