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Akos Fekete
Akos Fekete
Joined: 13 Nov 05
Posts: 560
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RE: I make up my mind to

Message 70801 in response to message 70800

Quote:
I make up my mind to buy E 4300. Is it okay running E@H?


Of course. I use E4300 for crunching Einstein too.

Quote:
And I want to use overclocking
Can it run Einstein faster?


Well, my E4300 is also overclocked.
From 1800 MHz to 3200 Mhz with the original CPU cooler.
It means nearly +80% computing performance. :)

Dave Burbank
Dave Burbank
Joined: 30 Jan 06
Posts: 275
Credit: 1,548,376
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RE: RE: I make up my mind

Message 70802 in response to message 70801

Quote:
Quote:
I make up my mind to buy E 4300. Is it okay running E@H?

Of course. I use E4300 for crunching Einstein too.
Quote:
And I want to use overclocking
Can it run Einstein faster?

Well, my E4300 is also overclocked.
From 1800 MHz to 3200 Mhz with the original CPU cooler.
It means nearly +80% computing performance. :)

Dang... that's one nice overclock there Akos. Have you tried watercooling that machine? I bet you could get a %100 o/c using water!

I've been overclocking for a bit now, and I have never come across any architecture that overclocks as well as the Core architecture, I would have to recommend (as many others have) one of the Intel chips that has been listed.

My Q6600 is running overclocked at 3200 MHz from a stock speed of 2400 MHz, and I've had it as high as 3900 MHz for benchmarking! These chips really like to o/c. If it was winter now, I'd be able to run it stable at 3400 MHz... not that I don't love the summer!

There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers. - Richard Feynman

Akos Fekete
Akos Fekete
Joined: 13 Nov 05
Posts: 560
Credit: 4,516,182
RAC: 370

RE: RE: Well, my E4300 is

Message 70803 in response to message 70802

Quote:
Quote:
Well, my E4300 is also overclocked.
From 1800 MHz to 3200 Mhz with the original CPU cooler.

Dang... that's one nice overclock there Akos.
Have you tried watercooling that machine?


I could not reach more than 3240MHz because of the FSB limit of the
motherboard. :-(

Dave Burbank
Dave Burbank
Joined: 30 Jan 06
Posts: 275
Credit: 1,548,376
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Still though, that's a golden

Still though, that's a golden CPU you have there. :-)
Good P965 motherboards have dropped significantly in price recently, you could probably pick one up for a relatively cheap price that is capable of a 400+ FSB.
That or the newer P35 boards are performing exceptionally well with higher FSBs.

There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers. - Richard Feynman

Gary Roberts
Gary Roberts
Moderator
Joined: 9 Feb 05
Posts: 5,236
Credit: 44,748,387,149
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RE: ... you could probably

Message 70805 in response to message 70804

Quote:
... you could probably pick one up for a relatively cheap price that is capable of a 400+ FSB...

Any particular P965 board you would recommend? - purely for crunching on a budget :).

Cheers,
Gary.

Dave Burbank
Dave Burbank
Joined: 30 Jan 06
Posts: 275
Credit: 1,548,376
RAC: 0

The Asus P5B and Gigabyte

The Asus P5B and Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3 are both good socket 775 motherboards, you can find them for a little over $100 USD.

Also now that the P965 chipset is getting older, e-bay or other second hand outlets may be a good choice...I know how you love your auctions!

There are 10^11 stars in the galaxy. That used to be a huge number. But it's only a hundred billion. It's less than the national deficit! We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers. - Richard Feynman

archae86
archae86
Joined: 6 Dec 05
Posts: 2,842
Credit: 3,380,124,703
RAC: 2,877,743

RE: The Asus P5B and

Message 70807 in response to message 70806

Quote:
The Asus P5B and Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3 are both good socket 775 motherboards, you can find them for a little over $100 USD.


I've built two machines this year using GA-965P-DS3.

Mostly, I like it. You'll find lots of commentary from users at NewEgg and on overclocking newsgroups.

My own two strongest issues comments:
1. This board has a fairly small passive heatsink on the Northbridge. It gets really, really hot. I chose to attach a small quiet 40mm fan (the mini-Kaze) crudely with a couple of 1 inch #6 oval-head wood screws. This gave me a little piece of mind, and seemed to help one problem.

2. On both my builds, I've seen some odd behavior of frequency/clock/FSB/voltage combinations which have trouble booting. Two rather odd symptoms of this are 1) an otherwise normal boot (as diagnosed by timings and the rather complex behavior of the IDE drive light, which generate no display at all or 2) spontaneous rebooting, in which it will start a boot, then self power-off for about three seconds, and start the boot again.

At this minute, my E6600 system (Stoll3 on my computer list) has been running stably for months at 3.0 GHz, 1.4V on a decent after-market cooler. The Q6600 system (Stoll4) is much newer, and has run 1 1-day run, and a second half-day run at 3.24 GHz 1.425V on a good after-market cooler. It won't reliably boot at that setting--though after 15 minutes of rest it gave a fully normal boot.

I like the DS3's claim to use more reliably "solid" capacitors in place of the usual trouble-plagued electrolytics, as I've got personal experience with large-scale electrolytic capacitor failure on an ASUS P4B533-E that ran Einstein/SETI for years at a much higher power condition that its original design center (I was running a Gallatin at 3.2 GHz).




Akos Fekete
Akos Fekete
Joined: 13 Nov 05
Posts: 560
Credit: 4,516,182
RAC: 370

RE: The Asus P5B and

Message 70808 in response to message 70806

Quote:
The Asus P5B and Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3 are both good socket 775 motherboards, you can find them for a little over $100 USD.


I use my E4300 in a Asus P5B motherboard.
But I also need to put a small cooler to the Northbridge heatsink.
That was much hotter than the heatsink of the CPU.

ohiomike
ohiomike
Joined: 4 Nov 06
Posts: 80
Credit: 6,453,639
RAC: 0

RE: RE: The Asus P5B and

Message 70809 in response to message 70808

Quote:
Quote:
The Asus P5B and Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3 are both good socket 775 motherboards, you can find them for a little over $100 USD.

I use my E4300 in a Asus P5B motherboard.
But I also need to put a small cooler to the Northbridge heatsink.
That was much hotter than the heatsink of the CPU.


That is most likely the most over-looked problem with over-clocking. CPU coolers are talked about often, the the northbridge and power supply heatsinks are overlooked. (CPU 50 drg C= OK, NB 85 drg C= ?). I've generally just made sure I have a lot of air going though the case (If your CPU cooler is cooling the CPU, but heating up the rest of the MB components you're asking for trouble).


Gary Roberts
Gary Roberts
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Joined: 9 Feb 05
Posts: 5,236
Credit: 44,748,387,149
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RE: 1. This board has a

Message 70810 in response to message 70807

Quote:
1. This board has a fairly small passive heatsink on the Northbridge. It gets really, really hot. I chose to attach a small quiet 40mm fan (the mini-Kaze) crudely with a couple of 1 inch #6 oval-head wood screws. This gave me a little piece of mind, and seemed to help one problem.

From my Athlon XP overclocking days, I made up special clamps from aliminium angle section which allowed me to create an extension to the stock heatsink on which I could mount a larger fan in place of the small stock CPU fan. As the Northbridge was quite close to the CPU socket, I was then able to have the spare stock cpu fan also attached to my extension frame but blowing straight down onto the passive Northbridge heatsink. I achieved cooler temps for both that way.

Quote:
I like the DS3's claim to use more reliably "solid" capacitors in place of the usual trouble-plagued electrolytics, as I've got personal experience with large-scale electrolytic capacitor failure ....

As I play with a lot of 2000 - 2002 vintage machines, I see this problem quite regularly. Sometimes the caps will explode quite violently and I've even seen one catch fire. Mostly however the caps will simply swell over a period of time and eventually release the pressure inside by rupturing. I decided to play around with repairing some of them to see what would happen. I've actually done about 10 motherboards to date with 100% success rate. In some cases, by finding capacitors that were in parallel, I was able to replace several smaller ones with one larger one eg 3 x 1500mF with 1 x 4700mF. The repaired boards have continued to work with no further problems. Obviously you need the right tools for the job but I was fortunate to have those.

With a good fine tip soldering iron, your board should be repairable. Of course it's not economic to do so if you have to pay someone else to do it :).

Cheers,
Gary.

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