Good books

KSMarksPsych
KSMarksPsych
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I just finished "Einstein's

I just finished "Einstein's Unfinished Symphony" and it was great.

It's all about the history of the search for gravitational waves.

I found it very accessible for a nonscientist.

Kathryn :o)

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tullio
tullio
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RE: I just finished

Message 47906 in response to message 47905

Quote:

I just finished "Einstein's Unfinished Symphony" and it was great.

It's all about the history of the search for gravitational waves.

I found it very accessible for a nonscientist.

Does it mention Joseph Weber? Amaldi? Pizzella?Bertotti? I have been in touch with all of them while working at Edizioni Scientifiche Mondadori in the Sixties and Seventies. I have published articles also by Remo Ruffini, Peter G.Bergmann and the Italian version of his "Riddle of gravitation". In those times experimental general relativity was rather "out" in the physics community and nobody could have foreseen its present development, in which I am proud to take a (very small) part.
Tullio

gravitonring
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free online: Fuzzy Logic from

Message 47907 in response to message 47906

free online: Fuzzy Logic from a physicist's POV:
http://www.simplecodeworks.com/KSCO/book/
title: Shades of Reality
author: Bob Bishop PhD
work history:
Apple core member [= or > Jobs Wozniak etc]
JPL
Simple source code inventor
and you can debate with him LIVE on skypecast
assuming skypecasts do not self destruct :)

everything is true, the opposite of everything is also true

KSMarksPsych
KSMarksPsych
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RE: RE: I just finished

Message 47908 in response to message 47906

Quote:
Quote:

I just finished "Einstein's Unfinished Symphony" and it was great.

It's all about the history of the search for gravitational waves.

I found it very accessible for a nonscientist.

Does it mention Joseph Weber? Amaldi? Pizzella?Bertotti? I have been in touch with all of them while working at Edizioni Scientifiche Mondadori in the Sixties and Seventies. I have published articles also by Remo Ruffini, Peter G.Bergmann and the Italian version of his "Riddle of gravitation". In those times experimental general relativity was rather "out" in the physics community and nobody could have foreseen its present development, in which I am proud to take a (very small) part.
Tullio

Weber definitely yes. I don't recognize any of the other names. I don't have the book handy (like next to me) to see if the others are mentioned. I found Weber's story interesting. He seemed like a neat character.

They talked about the bar detectors and I found those really interesting.

I'd love to hear some more about your experiences in the field.

Kathryn

Kathryn :o)

Einstein@Home Moderator

tullio
tullio
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RE: Weber definitely yes.

Message 47909 in response to message 47908

Quote:


Weber definitely yes. I don't recognize any of the other names. I don't have the book handy (like next to me) to see if the others are mentioned. I found Weber's story interesting. He seemed like a neat character.

They talked about the bar detectors and I found those really interesting.

I'd love to hear some more about your experiences in the field.

Kathryn


After I left Mondadori in 1979 and switched my interest to computers (I have a degree in theoretical physics which is totally useless outside academia) I lost touch with research and had to rely on newspapers for information, which are not always reliable sources (no Internet then). So I learned that in 1987 there was a great deal of excitement when a group at Rome University led by Edoardo Amaldi, a former coworker of Enrico Fermi and the great old man of Italian nuclear physics, announced in february 1987 they had detected a candidate signal in their cryogenic resonant bar detector at Frascati corresponding to a supernova in one nearby galaxy. The newspaper said the signal coincided in time with a neutrino burst recorded in the Mont Blanc tunnel by Torino scientists. Aside from this, it struck me that an elder scientist like Amaldi could turn his interests from nuclear and subnuclear physics to gravitation research. "Rinnovarsi o perire" had said his former boss Fermi (renovate or perish) who also, in his last years, had switched his attention from nuclear physics to computers (they are more important, concurred John von Neumann). Cheers.
Tullio

gravitonring
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‮ THE BIG BANG but who

Message 47910 in response to message 47909

‮ THE BIG BANG

but who is god?

Lewis Carroll

or Newton [you can pick Isaac or Roger] :)

or a write in vote :)

http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog/NEWTRU.html?show=catalogcopy

Quote:

...understanding of reality engendered by modern physics, the most theoretically advanced of the sciences....

...From Clockwork to Crapshoot: A History of Physics

What happens when laymen think like scientists:
http://www.twbookmark.com/books/13/0316090301/chapter_excerpt21796.html
Us and Them
by David Berreby

Quote:


Scientists, when they turn their attention to people, usually talk about the entire human race or about the individual human being. Those are two faces of the same idea. Truth about all is truth about each;

...Human kinds, whose memberships fall between All and One, map a much more variegated world than that one-size-fits-all label Homo sapiens.

http://www.davidberreby.com/work10.htm

David Berreby's .pdf interview with:

Quote:

Murray Gell-Mann, the co-discoverer (or co-inventor, if you prefer) of the quark.

everything is true, the opposite of everything is also true

KSMarksPsych
KSMarksPsych
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Thanks Tullio. I

Thanks Tullio.

I understand about degrees being useless outside academia. My masters is in developmenal psych. No clinical experience or training so no jobs in mental health.

Kathryn :o)

Einstein@Home Moderator

tullio
tullio
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RE: Thanks Tullio. I

Message 47912 in response to message 47911

Quote:
Thanks Tullio.
I understand about degrees being useless outside academia. My masters is in developmenal psych. No clinical experience or training so no jobs in mental health.


Which hardware are you running? Looks like a supercomputer from your results. Mine is a 400 MHz Pentium II using Linux. I an running Einstein@home, SETI@home and QMC@home meeting rhe deadlines, but I had to abandon CPDN, It would take me years to complete a WU. You are not doing bad for a psychologist. Cheers.
Tullio

Kalle437
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RE: I just finished

Message 47913 in response to message 47905

Quote:

I just finished "Einstein's Unfinished Symphony" and it was great.

It's all about the history of the search for gravitational waves.

I found it very accessible for a nonscientist.

How much knowledge of physics is needed to understand the content of that book? As for now, I'm going to the first course in Physics, Physics A, so its very basic.

KSMarksPsych
KSMarksPsych
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RE: RE: I just finished

Message 47914 in response to message 47913

Quote:
Quote:

I just finished "Einstein's Unfinished Symphony" and it was great.

It's all about the history of the search for gravitational waves.

I found it very accessible for a nonscientist.

How much knowledge of physics is needed to understand the content of that book? As for now, I'm going to the first course in Physics, Physics A, so its very basic.

Very little knowledge is needed.

I took physics in high school and the basic 3 quarter sequence in college (and I don't remember 99% of it).

Kathryn :o)

Einstein@Home Moderator

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