An Astronomy question not related to gravity

Dennis
Dennis
Joined: 19 Feb 05
Posts: 51
Credit: 4,459
RAC: 0

> > It makes me so sad to

Message 6234 in response to message 6233


>
> It makes me so sad to see young folks who are in school and don't know how
> lucky they are. They skip lectures I'd kill to get to go to. ............
> I'm at least as old as you are and very likely older. I've noticed that brain
> cells have a tendency to speed back up when they're used heavily. I restarted
> college a few months ago (IT) and am quite able to stay ahead of the 20 year
> olds. I'd suggest there isn't an age where you're too old to go after any
> educational pursuit that interests you.
>
> John Wheeler?

I was lucky and "lost the lottery" (#363 on birthdays pulled out of a hat in the vet days to see who was going to war - so we are about the same age).
I think an advantage of age is being able to stay focused, see the importance of things, and concern. I happen to teach some On-line classes and find that our "older" (our school ave is 35) are the ones that do the best. You are right the young ones just don't know what they have. I hope some day someone will set up a on-line relativity class.
I have a 20 year mission to learn this GR stuff - > 1 hour a day before excercise and breakfast.

- John Archibald Wheeler
for my money the smartest physics guy still alive today (@93).
Kip Thorne's prof -he would help his students whenever they asked for it. He has worked with such famous physicists as: Einstein, Thorne, Oppenheimer, Bohr, etc. In fact, Wheeler would take his students to the meet Albert Einstein. He was Feynman's prof as well.

StarCharter
StarCharter
Joined: 19 Feb 05
Posts: 59
Credit: 641,079
RAC: 0

> I was lucky and "lost the

Message 6235 in response to message 6234

> I was lucky and "lost the lottery" (#363 on birthdays pulled out of a hat in
> the vet days to see who was going to war - so we are about the same age).
> I think an advantage of age is being able to stay focused, see the importance
> of things, and concern. I happen to teach some On-line classes and find that
> our "older" (our school ave is 35) are the ones that do the best. You are
> right the young ones just don't know what they have. I hope some day someone
> will set up a on-line relativity class.

You are younger than me. I had gone to SouthEast Asia and returned to lick my wounds by the time the lottery was put it in. Whippersnapper...

BTW, did you see this article? It's about the possibility that Strangelets have passed through the earth. I asked about this in another thread and didn't get an answer. This doesn't seem to be psuedo-science but what do I know. I'm intrigued by the possiblty that Strangelets may indeed exist outside of quark stars and may indeed wander around the cosmos. If they exist in some quantity, they may account for a sizeable amount of universal mass. I'm also wondering if a collision between a Strangelet and another massive object (Black hole, neutron star, another stangelet, etc) wouldn't release one hell of a gravitational wave. Not periodic, of course.

I'm awfully fond of Stephen Hawking. A lot of this fell into place when I read "A Brief History of Time" and "The Universe in a Nutshel". If only he'd do "String Theory in a Peapod"...

There are two secrets to life: 1) Don't tell everything you know...

Dennis
Dennis
Joined: 19 Feb 05
Posts: 51
Credit: 4,459
RAC: 0

>

Message 6236 in response to message 6235

> href="https://einsteinathome.org/%3Ca%20href%3D"http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.02/matter.html">http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/11.02/matter.html"> this article[/url]?
> It's about the possibility that Strangelets have passed through the earth. I
> asked about this in another thread and didn't get an answer. This doesn't seem
> to be psuedo-science but what do I know.

I don't know what to think about those (strangelets) either.

I am still wondering why they worry about "missing matter" or
"Dark matter". I have not figured out if they just are thinking that there HAS to be more mass somewhere to account for the gravitational forces. I have not yet seen why it could not just be that the gravitational constant was not just larger (at the time they are looking at). How can they separate the equations to know if what they see is a result of more mass or greater gravity or a little of both? From my warped point of view, the effects they claim for "proof" of dark matter is due to the non- constant gravitational forces via the large number hypothesis.

- The one who has the most fun - WINS.

Dennis

Nereid
Nereid
Joined: 9 Feb 05
Posts: 79
Credit: 925,034
RAC: 0

Hey you guys! Why not take a

Hey you guys! Why not take a gander at physicsforums.com? You'll find lots and lots of discussion there, on these topics and much more (and they welcome good questions from really old farts like us!).

Joey9.5
Joey9.5
Joined: 8 Mar 05
Posts: 14
Credit: 18,814
RAC: 0

> The heading for this fourm

> The heading for this fourm says that it's for questions about science and
> physics. I'm probably wrong for posting this question here because it has
> nothing to do with gravity (at least, not directly) but I really would like to
> understand this.
> A team of astronomers at UCSD have discovered a quasar whose red-shift (2.11)
> indicates that it is several billions of light years away and yet it appears
> "closely associated" with a galaxy that's only 300 million light years away.
> The article is href="https://einsteinathome.org/%3Ca%20href%3D"http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/newsrel/science/mcquasar.asp">http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/newsrel/science/mcquasar.asp"> HERE [/url]
>
> What does this mean?
> Does it mean that perhaps quasars aren't the distant objects with incredibly
> high energies that we thought they were?
> Does it mean that their apparent red-shift may be due to something else and
> isn't attributable to Doppler effect?
> Does it mean that they really aren't "closely associated" and that's only an
> illusion?
>
>
>
>Well, even if the object was closely associated with a nearby galaxy, it could still have a large redshift due to the fact that it could be orbiting around that galasxy in question rapidly. If it was moving away from us in the orbit, it would have a large redshift. The redshift of the orbiting object would also be increased by the galaxy that the possible quasar is a satellite of. Even though black holes which form quasars are usually in the centers of galaxies, depending on the galaxy that the "quasar" is "closely associated" with, it could be possible that the quasar is from the remnant core of a smaller galaxy which was absorbed by a larger galaxy, which the quasar is now associated with.

My cat eats people

Joey9.5
Joey9.5
Joined: 8 Mar 05
Posts: 14
Credit: 18,814
RAC: 0

> Wow that is

Message 6239 in response to message 6228

> Wow that is interesting...
>
> I dunno I have been an amateur astronomer a long time and quasars and now
> blazars have always seemed a bit of an enigma. It wouldn't surprise me in the
> least if our current theories were over turned but I don't think that's going
> to happen even if the facts say otherwise.
>
> I'll ask my Astro Prof at U.T. what he thinks
>

Question
What exactly is a blazar?
I think it is a type of very high energy quasar, but I am not sure

My cat eats people

lysdexia
lysdexia
Joined: 9 Mar 05
Posts: 97
Credit: 17,013
RAC: 0

over turned ->

over turned -> overturned
excercise -> exercise


"My other computer is a virus farm."

Tony I
Tony I
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 4
Credit: 1,188
RAC: 0

Halton Arp produced a catalog

Halton Arp produced a catalog of peculiar galaxies. That's a lot of work and commitment. He is no doubt intelligent. Doesn't mean he isn't crazier than an outhouse rat. Apparently he has company in the Burbidge clan. No doubt they sat around together and decided they all wanted to attain some level of notariety within the profession they had each dedicated so much to. Gotta' hand it to each of them though ... takes guts to get up there and explain to the entire community that BB cosmology is bunk. These guys are out there. Big Bang has withstood many fundamental tests for a long time now. But it's good for all fields to have their wacko's .... If nothing else, it keeps debate lively.

barkster
barkster
Joined: 3 Apr 05
Posts: 71
Credit: 447,475
RAC: 0

RE: BTW, did you see this

Message 6242 in response to message 6235

Quote:
BTW, did you see this article? It's about the possibility that Strangelets have passed through the earth. I asked about this in another thread and didn't get an answer. This doesn't seem to be psuedo-science but what do I know. I'm intrigued by the possiblty that Strangelets may indeed exist outside of quark stars and may indeed wander around the cosmos. If they exist in some quantity, they may account for a sizeable amount of universal mass. I'm also wondering if a collision between a Strangelet and another massive object (Black hole, neutron star, another stangelet, etc) wouldn't release one hell of a gravitational wave. Not periodic, of course.

Maybe Herrin and Teplitz could make another @home project to punch through all the digital siezmometer data.

"No, I'm not a scientist... but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express."

TANSTAAFL
TANSTAAFL
Joined: 4 Mar 05
Posts: 1
Credit: 945
RAC: 0

RE: Halton Arp produced a

Message 6243 in response to message 6241

Quote:
Halton Arp produced a catalog of peculiar galaxies. That's a lot of work and commitment. He is no doubt intelligent. Doesn't mean he isn't crazier than an outhouse rat. Apparently he has company in the Burbidge clan. No doubt they sat around together and decided they all wanted to attain some level of notariety within the profession they had each dedicated so much to. Gotta' hand it to each of them though ... takes guts to get up there and explain to the entire community that BB cosmology is bunk. These guys are out there. Big Bang has withstood many fundamental tests for a long time now. But it's good for all fields to have their wacko's .... If nothing else, it keeps debate lively.


Halton Arp's ideas have been debated several times in the Bad Astronomy/Against the Mainstream forum. You can do a search for "Arp" and come up with more threads.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.