Z Workunits

hoarfrost
hoarfrost
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Topic 190801

My boinc crunching some "z" workunits. It is a new data set? (Clear or another "transform" of previous data set?)

Thank you!

Ben Owen
Ben Owen
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Z Workunits

Hoarfrost,

"z1" refers to which interferometer it is. And, uh, I can't for the life of me remember whether it's Hanford or Livingston! Most of them should be Hanford, since that was doing better during S4. Normally those are called H1 and L1, so why the funky name? It's basically because some machines would be running a mixture of "albert" and "einstein" workunits, and the filenames needed to be kept separate. If you recall, we got into some trouble with the first switchover because the filenames were not unique. "Once bitten, twice shy" as we say in English.

Hope this helps,
Ben

David Hammer
David Hammer
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RE: Hoarfrost, "z1" refers

Message 25327 in response to message 25326

Quote:

Hoarfrost,

"z1" refers to which interferometer it is. And, uh, I can't for the life of me remember whether it's Hanford or Livingston! Most of them should be Hanford, since that was doing better during S4. Normally those are called H1 and L1, so why the funky name? It's basically because some machines would be running a mixture of "albert" and "einstein" workunits, and the filenames needed to be kept separate. If you recall, we got into some trouble with the first switchover because the filenames were not unique. "Once bitten, twice shy" as we say in English.

Hope this helps,
Ben

The z stands for "Zucker" (director of Livingston)
and r stands for "Raab" (director of Hanford)

We needed to keep the workunit names short so I had to be creative.

hoarfrost
hoarfrost
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RE: Hope this

Message 25328 in response to message 25326

Quote:
Hope this helps,
Ben


Thank you Ben! Thank you David!

I notice that different WU's have a different behaviour - some of them have a "big step" in "stellar grid", but some of them - much smaller. Why? Different "precision" of analysis?

Ben Owen
Ben Owen
Joined: 21 Dec 04
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Credit: 33,971,764
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Thanks, David. Makes sense

Thanks, David. Makes sense about the names.

Hoarfrost, the workunits can have very different grid steps depending on the frequency of the data analyzed. At low frequencies the signal does not contain much information on the sky position, and so the grid step is very large. I think the lowest frequency is 50Hz and those work units only have a few hundred grid points. The highest is 1500Hz and those have a couple million.

I'm sorry to give you such vague numbers. My grad student, a former postdoc, and I did the calculations and wrote the code for those grids, but that was ages ago and my memory is pretty hazy.

Hope this helps,
Ben

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