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Bernd Machenschalk
Bernd Machenschalk
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RE: Hey Bernd ;-) I think

Message 74877 in response to message 74876

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Hey Bernd ;-) I think that makes two "false friends" in a single sentence...


What's the second?

And yes, I'm not getting much sleep these days...

BM

BM

Annika
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I was referring to "actually"

I was referring to "actually" and "sensible". Yeah, no wonder, sounds really stressful what you're doing atm. Hope it'll all work out soon!

Bernd Machenschalk
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Well, they are in different

Well, they are in different sentences, and "actually" should really mean something like "truly" here. "sensible" of course should be "sensitive", and is indeed a false friend of German origin.

BM

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DB
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RE: Well, they are in

Message 74880 in response to message 74879

Quote:

Well, they are in different sentences, and "actually" should really mean something like "truly" here. "sensible" of course should be "sensitive", and is indeed a false friend of German origin.

BM


You might be interested to know that "sensible" meaning "sensitive" isn't incorrect in English. It has just fallen into disuse.

"actually" didn't look wrong from where I was reading, either ;)

David

Annika
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Okay, my mistake then. Sorry.

Okay, my mistake then. Sorry.
DB: I didn't know that. That's quite interesting; it probably comes from the same origin as the German word... though I can't say which.

Bernd Machenschalk
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RE: it probably comes from

Message 74882 in response to message 74881

Quote:
it probably comes from the same origin as the German word... though I can't say which.


Comes from latin "sentire" (Duden, Etymologie: Herkunftswörterbuch der deutschen Sprache), probably spread by the Romans.

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Annika
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Latin... I should have

Latin... I should have guessed. Never learned that language, though (I only had English and French at school, which is more useful for everyday conversation, of course, but I sometimes miss being able to understand where the words come from cause that's mostly latin).
Strange how those message boards are often good for language discussions ;-) I remember one we had about the term "to give up the ghost", which I hadn't known existed in any other language besides German but turned out to have biblical origins...

Bernd Machenschalk
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RE: Strange how those

Message 74884 in response to message 74883

Quote:
Strange how those message boards are often good for language discussions ;-) I remember one we had about the term "to give up the ghost", which I hadn't known existed in any other language besides German but turned out to have biblical origins...


I'd guess it's Ananias in Acts 5 who "gave up the ghost" (probably King James version)? IIRC the "King James" bible has actually been translated from Luther's text, who should be made responsible for this phrase then. [edit]Sorry, that's wrong (according to Wikipedia). Probably the wording is already in the Greek source.[/edit]

BM

BM

archae86
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RE: RE: Strange how those

Message 74885 in response to message 74884

Quote:
Quote:
Strange how those message boards are often good for language discussions ;-) I remember one we had about the term "to give up the ghost", which I hadn't known existed in any other language besides German but turned out to have biblical origins...

I'd guess it's Ananias in Acts 5 who "gave up the ghost" (probably King James version)?

BM


A quick check on "ghost" in a Cruden's Condensed Concordance suggests that most times the word ghost was used (I assume this is in the Authorized Version, aka King James) was in that phrase, including:

Gen 49:33 (yielded up the ghost)
Job 10:18, 11:20, 14:10
Jer 15:9
Mat 27:50 (yielded up the ghost)
Acts 5:10 (said of Sapphira, the spouse of Ananias)

Bernd Machenschalk
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RE: A quick check on

Message 74886 in response to message 74885

Quote:

A quick check on "ghost" in a Cruden's Condensed Concordance suggests that most times the word ghost was used (I assume this is in the Authorized Version, aka King James) was in that phrase, including:

Gen 49:33 (yielded up the ghost)
Job 10:18, 11:20, 14:10
Jer 15:9
Mat 27:50 (yielded up the ghost)
Acts 5:10 (said of Sapphira, the spouse of Ananias)


Quite interesting. So in Mathew and Acts this is already cited from the Old Testament. Gen 49 refers to Jacob, there should be a similar term referring to Abraham (Gen 25:8). Mathew speaks of Jesus, Acts 5:5 talks about Ananias, and 5:10 about his wife.

Ok, we get a little bit distracted here, we should probably move this to an own thread in the Cafe.

BM

BM

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