VIRGO

tullio
tullio
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Topic 209029

VIRGO has `started collecting data on August 1 according to a press release of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nuclear which manages it at Cascina, Pisa, and will go on until August 25, the end of the run 2 of LIGO interferometers. Go Virgo!

Tullio

astro-marwil
astro-marwil
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Hallo Tulio! It´s great!

Hallo Tulio!

It´s great! This will drastically increase the pointing accuracy towards the GW source.

We do hope now, for a comparable starting event as GW150914 for LIGO. 

 

Kind regards and happy crunching

Martin

tullio
tullio
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There are some news. A Virgo

There are some news. A LIGO spokesman says wait for tomorrow for a statement. Someone from Texas University has twitted that a GW from a neutron star has been detected. The news is reported on the La Repubblica online paper.

Tullio

Betreger
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If true that's great news.

If true that's great news.

archae86
archae86
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You can read a New Scientist

You can read a New Scientist article on the detection rumors.

Betreger
Betreger
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I eagerly await good news

I eagerly await good news

tullio
tullio
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In a "Nature" article I read

In a "Nature" article I read that every radio, optical and gamma-ray telescope has been observing galaxy NGC 4993 in Hydra in the hope of detecting an object which may have emitted GW.

Tullio

Jim1348
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I am wondering whether

I am wondering whether Einstein could detect the gravity waves from these neutron stars before the collision.  Is this a good test of the sensitivity of this project, or are the neutron stars too far away?

tullio
tullio
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I think the neutron stars

I think the neutron stars should have some asymmetry for emitting GW. This is the signal we are searching for at Einstein@home. From press statements it looks like it was the Fermi gamma-ray spacecraft which detected probably a gamma ray burst in the NGC 4993 galaxy and gave an alarm. We are also crunching Fermi data.

Tullio

Virgo report:

The Virgo and LIGO Scientific Collaborations have been observing since November 30, 2016 in the second Advanced Detector Observing Run ‘O2’, searching for gravitational-wave signals, first with the two LIGO detectors, then with both LIGO and Virgo instruments operating together since August 1, 2017. Some promising gravitational-wave candidates have been identified in data from both LIGO and Virgo during our preliminary analysis, and we have shared what we currently know with astronomical observing partners. We are working hard to assure that the candidates are valid gravitational-wave events, and it will require time to establish the level of confidence needed to bring any results to the scientific community and the greater public. We will let you know as soon we have information ready to share.

Jim1348
Jim1348
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tullio wrote:I think the

tullio wrote:
I think the neutron stars should have some asymmetry for emitting GW. This is the signal we are searching for at Einstein@home.

Thanks.  Maybe at some point when they find something it will be clear what science can result from that.  At the moment, it just seems to me that they merely confirm that there are some asymmetric stars or binary systems, which would not seem to be that big of a deal.  But maybe they can deduce other interesting properties from that.  Also, they may not want to announce anything until publication time, so we may just have to wait.

tullio
tullio
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Virgo speaks of "astronomical

Virgo speaks of "astronomical observing partners". This agrees with both "New Scientist" and "Nature" articles, which say that radiotelescopes such as ALMA, optical telescopes like Hubble, IR telescopes like Spitzer, X-Ray telescopes such as Chandra and gamma-ray telescopes like Fermi were all pointed at galaxy 4993. There is obviously a reason for this interest.

Tullio

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