Simple Project Question

Steve Dyer
Steve Dyer
Joined: 24 Feb 05
Posts: 8
Credit: 44,607
RAC: 0
Topic 188001

Hi,

I don't know much about astrophysics. (I'm pretty sure I exist in this universe, but I can't even vouch for you)

I took part in the cancer project elsewhere, where the aim was to get lots and lots of "hits".

I did some Seti, where one "true" signal would equate to finding a monolith on the moon.

My question is, what is considered a success with this project? Are we hoping for one "true" positive, 1000, or 100,000?

Many thanks!

Dennis
Dennis
Joined: 19 Feb 05
Posts: 51
Credit: 4,459
RAC: 0

Simple Project Question

> Hi,
>
> I don't know much about astrophysics. (I'm pretty sure I exist in this
> universe, but I can't even vouch for you)
>
> I took part in the cancer project elsewhere, where the aim was to get lots and
> lots of "hits".
>
> I did some Seti, where one "true" signal would equate to finding a monolith on
> the moon.
>
> My question is, what is considered a success with this project? Are we hoping
> for one "true" positive, 1000, or 100,000?
>
> Many thanks!
>
Good question,
I still wonder if we are just looking for pulsars, millisecond pulsars, binary pulsars or what.
If it is just finding any pulsars then we have a very good chance at finding things. If it is a binary millisecond pulsar, the odds go way way down.
I know why we are looking but I still haven't figured out how we are doing it.

debugas
debugas
Joined: 11 Nov 04
Posts: 170
Credit: 77,331
RAC: 0

We are looking for

We are looking for gravitational waves (GW) generated by pulsars

here comes a quote of a guy (Ben Owen) involved into the project:

"All pulsars should generate some gravitational waves; it's just a question of how strong. That is very poorly constrained by theory, and the work units you are crunching are dedicated towards firming that up with observation.

Most pulsars should generate most of their gravitational wave signal at twice the spin frequency. So the 641 Hz pulsar, which is the fastest currently known, should emit gravitational waves at 1282 Hz. Broadly speaking, the detectors are sensitive from there down to a few tens of Hz, but the signals generally get fainter at lower frequencies and the noise starts getting stronger below about 150-200 Hz."

from the quote above i draw a conclusion that the success would be if we detect at least one GW signal, but the more we detect the better

Martin P.
Martin P.
Joined: 17 Feb 05
Posts: 162
Credit: 39,178,515
RAC: 1,172

> We are looking for

Message 5301 in response to message 5300

> We are looking for gravitational waves (GW) generated by pulsars
>
> here comes a quote of a guy (Ben Owen) involved into the project:
>
> "All pulsars should generate some gravitational waves; it's just a question of
> how strong. That is very poorly constrained by theory, and the work units you
> are crunching are dedicated towards firming that up with observation.
>
> Most pulsars should generate most of their gravitational wave signal at twice
> the spin frequency. So the 641 Hz pulsar, which is the fastest currently
> known, should emit gravitational waves at 1282 Hz. Broadly speaking, the
> detectors are sensitive from there down to a few tens of Hz, but the signals
> generally get fainter at lower frequencies and the noise starts getting
> stronger below about 150-200 Hz."
>
> from the quote above i draw a conclusion that the success would be if we
> detect at least one GW signal, but the more we detect the better
>

debugas,

thanks for the explaination! Is there a page where we can see whether we found anything or not? On the SETI Classic homepage they haave a very nice summary of who found what and hat that means. Anything comparable here at E@H?

tenfiveoh
tenfiveoh
Joined: 8 Nov 04
Posts: 50
Credit: 2,647,527
RAC: 52

Check this thread for yet

Check this thread for yet another piece of the puzzle.

http://einsteinathome.org/node/187966

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