Saving your primary harddisk

Keck_Komputers
Keck_Komputers
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The "write to disk"

The "write to disk" preference is the minimum an application must wait between checkpoints, the default is 60 seconds. However not all applications respect this setting. It also does not prevent BOINC from saving it's state file as needed. So setting it to something higher will reduce the frequency of writes but not always as much as you would expect.

BOINC WIKI

BOINCing since 2002/12/8

Dex
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RE: The "write to disk"

Message 59071 in response to message 59070

Quote:
The "write to disk" preference is the minimum an application must wait between checkpoints, the default is 60 seconds. However not all applications respect this setting. It also does not prevent BOINC from saving it's state file as needed. So setting it to something higher will reduce the frequency of writes but not always as much as you would expect.

Keck_Komputers:

Actually if you open your General Preferences, and look at option for write to disk, it says, 'Write to disk at most every'... You will find that is NOT the minimal time a application waits to write to disk. It is the MAXIMUM time the application will wait to write to disk. The grammar, and application actions show this... So, this is controling the applications from waiting longer than you wish, to save a checkpoint.

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Gary Roberts
Gary Roberts
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RE: .... it says, 'Write to

Message 59072 in response to message 59071

Quote:
.... it says, 'Write to disk at most every'... You will find that is NOT the minimal time a application waits ....

Sorry, you need to think more carefully about what the words are saying :). It is the minimum time. If the application respects this guideline you should not see a disk write from the science app any more frequently than this time. The fact that it also happens to be the maximum time you usually observe is just a testament to BOINCs diligence in following the rules quickly :).

You need to read more carefully what John says. He really does know his stuff :).

Cheers,
Gary.

Keck_Komputers
Keck_Komputers
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RE: RE: .... it says,

Message 59073 in response to message 59072

Quote:
Quote:
.... it says, 'Write to disk at most every'... You will find that is NOT the minimal time a application waits ....

Sorry, you need to think more carefully about what the words are saying :). It is the minimum time. If the application respects this guideline you should not see a disk write from the science app any more frequently than this time. The fact that it also happens to be the maximum time you usually observe is just a testament to BOINCs diligence in following the rules quickly :).

You need to read more carefully what John says. He really does know his stuff :).


Actually it is a testament to E@H being able to checkpoint frequently, it can checkpoint each time the target moves in the graphics display. Other really fast checkpointing projects are LHC at each turn, and SETI after each FFT (less than 10 seconds usually). CPDN is a bad project for checkpoints, it may take 15 to 30 minutes and it will ignore the setting if it is larger. There are also a few that don't checkpoint at all.

BOINC checkpointing

BOINC WIKI

BOINCing since 2002/12/8

Dex
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Going over the phrase "Write

Going over the phrase "Write to disk at most every...Seconds" is confusing me to a point. In two different views, it can mean two different things. But in the idea, that applications do not seem to always abide by it, I assumed it meant likewise... Sorry if I corrected you in wrong John. :)

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Mike Hewson
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RE: Going over the phrase

Message 59075 in response to message 59074

Quote:
Going over the phrase "Write to disk at most every...Seconds" is confusing me to a point. In two different views, it can mean two different things. But in the idea, that applications do not seem to always abide by it, I assumed it meant likewise... Sorry if I corrected you in wrong John. :)


It's the English language really, it doesn't have hard syntax! :-)
The phrase more precisely means 'at a frequency no greater than that which is indicated by the period of so & so seconds'. Add in that a frequency is the inverse of a period and you have the problem.
Aside: For instance it is likely that post WWII some Japanese soldiers inadvertently and incorrectly admitted to warcrimes they didn't in fact commit, simply due to such conceptual incongruencies arising from the process of translation to their native tongue. Guilty or otherwise, they were really answering a different question than the one asked....

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter ...

... and my other CPU is a Ryzen 5950X :-) Blaise Pascal

Dex
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In college, I minored in

In college, I minored in linguistics. And even being, that english is my first and primary language, I find it the most difficult language I have seen yet...

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Pooh Bear 27
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English seems to be a lazy

English seems to be a lazy language. Too many words that say the same thing. Most languages barely have one, you just change the gender as needed.

We also have too many words that have the same sound. So, I can find it difficult to learn.

Just some examples of words that can confuse people even those who speak the language natively.

Too, to, two. Threw, through. See, sea.

And a couple of sentences that can mean about the same thing:

Have a nice day. May your day be nice.
When are we going to eat? Is it time to eat? When is dinner?

So, with all the words that we use, and can be twisted around to mean more or less the same thing, I can see how a structured language country can have so much difficulty in learning English.

DanNeely
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RE: RE: Going over the

Message 59078 in response to message 59075

Quote:
Quote:
Going over the phrase "Write to disk at most every...Seconds" is confusing me to a point. In two different views, it can mean two different things. But in the idea, that applications do not seem to always abide by it, I assumed it meant likewise... Sorry if I corrected you in wrong John. :)

It's the English language really, it doesn't have hard syntax! :-)
The phrase more precisely means 'at a frequency no greater than that which is indicated by the period of so & so seconds'. Add in that a frequency is the inverse of a period and you have the problem.
Aside: For instance it is likely that post WWII some Japanese soldiers inadvertently and incorrectly admitted to warcrimes they didn't in fact commit, simply due to such conceptual incongruencies arising from the process of translation to their native tongue. Guilty or otherwise, they were really answering a different question than the one asked....

Cheers, Mike.

This sort of stuff is one reason why I hate having to write testplans and end user documentation for my apps at work. At times the formalisms we use to avoid ambiguity really do sound somewhat odd.

IN this case though there's an easy working fix. "Maximum time between disk writes" or "Minimum time between disk writes" depending on which meaning was actually intended.

Dex
Dex
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RE: IN this case though

Message 59079 in response to message 59078

Quote:
IN this case though there's an easy working fix. "Maximum time between disk writes" or "Minimum time between disk writes" depending on which meaning was actually intended.

Dan

I think that it is a great idea for the wording.

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