Possible new source of gravitational waves

Mahray
Mahray
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Topic 193608

An interesting article on NewScientist about mountains on neutrons stars causing gravitational waves. Also a nice mention of Einstein@Home.

Check it out at http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn13566-mountains-on-stars-could-trigger-gravitational-waves.html

Chipper Q
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Possible new source of gravitational waves

So if gravitational waves can be inferred from measuring a change in the orbital period of a binary system (as with PSR 1913+16), then would it be possible to infer which neutron stars are good candidates for producing gravitational waves by measuring a change in the rotational period? I understand that pulsars rotate with a regularity that rivals atomic clocks with regard to timing, but wouldn't that make the measurement easier (or more precise) over time?

Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
Bikeman (Heinz-...
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RE: I understand that

Message 80584 in response to message 80583

Quote:
I understand that pulsars rotate with a regularity that rivals atomic clocks with regard to timing, but wouldn't that make the measurement easier (or more precise) over time?

It seems to be more complex:
In general pulsars slow down over time, and have some unpredictable "glitches" when their rotational speed suddenly changes.

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/print/1756

CU
Bikeman

Chipper Q
Chipper Q
Joined: 20 Feb 05
Posts: 1,540
Credit: 708,571
RAC: 0

RE: RE: I understand

Message 80585 in response to message 80584

Quote:
Quote:
I understand that pulsars rotate with a regularity that rivals atomic clocks with regard to timing, but wouldn't that make the measurement easier (or more precise) over time?

It seems to be more complex:
In general pulsars slow down over time, and have some unpredictable "glitches" when their rotational speed suddenly changes.

http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/print/1756

CU
Bikeman


Ah, thanks Bikeman. It didn't occur to me that the conditions would still be quite dynamic – I recall reading about starquakes but didn't think anything would affect the overall rotation rate other than the star releasing some additional energy in the form of gravitational waves. It's amazing how the crust has superfluid under it and the vacuum of space around it, and yet it can still “catch� on something to cause a noticeable glitch in the rotation. So, what's the catch? Well, if the wavefunction of the superfluid has singularities, I can see (sort of) how that would be a catch...

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