Interesting article on the search for the Higg's Boson(Very Readable)

Rod
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I just finished reading this article in a Canadian newspaper on the search for The Higg's Boson. It very readable.

The Gleam in God's Eye

There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot. - Aldo Leopold

tullio
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Interesting article on the search for the Higg's Boson(Very Read

Quote:

I just finished reading this article in a Canadian newspaper on the search for The Higg's Boson. It very readable.

Very readable. But no particle accelerator has ever found what it was looking for, it usually finds something else, which needs a bigger accelerator to be investigated and so on. This observation is not mine but Emilio Segre's , a coworker of Fermi and Nobel Prize winner. There was a book by two Italian physicists, Angelo Baracca and Silvio Bergia, whose title was "The spiral of high energies", referring both to the particles' trajectories in a cyclotron and the phenomenon outlined by prof. Segre' in an article in "Endeavour" magazine in or about 1972 . Also a pity the Canadian article did not mention the LHC@home project.
Tullio

Rod
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I apologize for posting this

I apologize for posting this article. It seems there is a time limit when this article is available for no cost.

There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot. - Aldo Leopold

tullio
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See also this:Higgs boson is

See also this:
Higgs boson is lighter
Tullio

tullio
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Looks like there will be a

Looks like there will be a new accelerator, the International Linear Collider, perhaps in Japan. So even the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is already obsolescent even before starting. See my previuos post citing the "The high energies spiral" by Angelo Baracca and Silvio Bergia.
Tullio

tullio
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According to the NYTimes the

According to the NYTimes the new accelerator should cost 6.7 billion dollars against the 3.77 billion dollars of LHC, which makes use of an existing tunnel and other facilites at CERN. This is really Big Science. The Big Bang probably costs less.
Tullio

Chipper Q
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RE: According to the

Message 58274 in response to message 58273

Quote:
According to the NYTimes the new accelerator should cost 6.7 billion dollars against the 3.77 billion dollars of LHC, which makes use of an existing tunnel and other facilites at CERN. This is really Big Science. The Big Bang probably costs less.
Tullio


That's funny...

From the article you mentioned earlier, Tullio, it's exciting to hear that the Higgs boson is within reach of the Tevatron and Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). I'm still taking in the lectures on the LHC (given at the SLAC Summer Institute, 7/06) that Mike Hewson kindly pointed out a while back. Many possibilities from many good ideas and theories. I'm certainly looking forward to seeing exactly how things get their mass. Having now an upper limit of 153 GeV for the mass of the Higgs, does this help in any way to determine more precisely how sensitive the LIGOs must be in order to detect gravity waves?

And regarding the proposed ILC, does anyone know if the design includes using laser-wakefield acceleration?

tullio
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A Higgs boson could be a good

A Higgs boson could be a good Valentine gift for a physicist's girlfriend (about ten billion dollars worth).
Tullio

Chipper Q
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RE: A Higgs boson could be

Message 58276 in response to message 58275

Quote:
A Higgs boson could be a good Valentine gift for a physicist's girlfriend (about ten billion dollars worth).
Tullio


Yeah, but how many billions is it these days before you're talking real money? :)

So, I gather you're expecting new physics from all the high energy research. From my naïve perspective, I doubt we'll see a repeat of something like the discovery of the muon (i.e., 'who ordered that'), but then again, the simple description of the Higgs field sounds an awful lot like the ether that was supposed to be the medium for light waves. But this is an evaluation of history, and not of the Standard Model. From what I've learned so far, if the Standard Model predicts it, then eventually it's found. And there's just one prediction left (for the constituents of 'normal' matter, anyway).

Just out of curiosity, does the quality of the quark-gluon soup (observed at the RHIC), described as that of being a perfect liquid (instead of a gas or plasma), affect your outlook regarding the Higgs boson in any way?

tullio
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RE: So, I gather you're

Message 58277 in response to message 58276

Quote:


So, I gather you're expecting new physics from all the high energy research. From my naïve perspective, I doubt we'll see a repeat of something like the discovery of the muon (i.e., 'who ordered that'), but then again, the simple description of the Higgs field sounds an awful lot like the ether that was supposed to be the medium for light waves. But this is an evaluation of history, and not of the Standard Model. From what I've learned so far, if the Standard Model predicts it, then eventually it's found. And there's just one prediction left (for the constituents of 'normal' matter, anyway).

Just out of curiosity, does the quality of the quark-gluon soup (observed at the RHIC), described as that of being a perfect liquid (instead of a gas or plasma), affect your outlook regarding the Higgs boson in any way?


Theory determines what can be observed, said Albert Einstein. It must be true, otherwise we would not be searching for gravitational waves. As a matter of fact, although being a (retired) theoretical physicist, I have some doubts about the wisdom of spending so much money in a search for the Higgs boson or other exotic particles, such as those conceived by supersimmetry. "Physics is on a wrong track", said Ettore Majorana before disappearing at sea between Palermo and Naples in 1938. I suspect he was right. Regarding your last question, it does not make any difference to me. Cheers.
Tullio

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