Gravity waves could hold key to supersymmetry

EigenState
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Topic 194030

From PhysOrg.com:

Gravity waves could hold key to supersymmetry

Quote:

"In Geneva," Anupam Mazumdar tells PhysOrg.com, "there is a big effort to discover supersymmetry particles at the Large Hadron Collider. But that is not the only way to find these particles. We should also be able to see supersymmetry in the sky through the observation of gravitational waves."

Mazumdar, a physicist at Lancaster University in Britain, worked with Alex Kusenko at the University of California, Los Angeles to simulate what kind of frequency distribution would result from the fragmentation of unstable scalar condensate. The two say that a number of devices, including the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and the Big Bank Observer (BBO), would be able to detect the gravitational waves they describe in “Gravitational waves from fragmentation of a primordial scalar condensate into Q-balls,� which has been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters.

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
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Gravity waves could hold key to supersymmetry

Quote:

From PhysOrg.com:

Gravity waves could hold key to supersymmetry

Quote:

"In Geneva," Anupam Mazumdar tells PhysOrg.com, "there is a big effort to discover supersymmetry particles at the Large Hadron Collider. But that is not the only way to find these particles. We should also be able to see supersymmetry in the sky through the observation of gravitational waves."

Mazumdar, a physicist at Lancaster University in Britain, worked with Alex Kusenko at the University of California, Los Angeles to simulate what kind of frequency distribution would result from the fragmentation of unstable scalar condensate. The two say that a number of devices, including the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) and the Big Bank Observer (BBO), would be able to detect the gravitational waves they describe in “Gravitational waves from fragmentation of a primordial scalar condensate into Q-balls,� which has been accepted for publication in Physical Review Letters.


Looks like the idea is to pick up big-bang era ( super ) symmetry breaking kicking out gravitons/waves in a way coherent enough to leave a distinguishing signal detectable about now. The model quoted also predicts inflation and CMB features. Heaven knows what a Q-ball is, but clearly isn't the type seen on pool tables! :-)

Cheers, Mike.

( edit ) The associated commentary on that article mentions 'Desperately Seeking SUSY', wryly implying a strenuous theoretical search for a result to be positively tested against.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

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