Another new PSR seen on twitter J1953+28

AgentB
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Topic 197899

Apologies if it´s posted elsewhere - but congratulations again E@H!

J1953+28

Looking at http://einsteinathome.org/radiopulsar/html/BRP4_discoveries/ .

Why are some pulsars are named JNNNN+/-NN but others are JNNNN+/-NNNN ?

Mike Hewson
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Another new PSR seen on twitter J1953+28

Quote:

Apologies if it´s posted elsewhere - but congratulations again E@H!

J1953+28

Looking at http://einsteinathome.org/radiopulsar/html/BRP4_discoveries/ .

Why are some pulsars are named JNNNN+/-NN but others are JNNNN+/-NNNN ?


The second figure is declination above/below the celestial equator. Two are usual, four figures if one needs to disambiguate from a nearby ones eg.

J1908+0457
J1908+0500
J1908+0734
J1908+0833
J1908+0909
J1908+0916

indicates a pretty busy area of the sky.

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter ...

... and my other CPU is a Ryzen 5950X :-) Blaise Pascal

DanNeely
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The name is based on

The name is based on celestial coordinates; pulsars with a positive value for the 2nd number are in the northern hemisphere, those with a negative value in the southern hemisphere. Declination goes from +-90 degrees; a 3rd or 4th digit represent values one or two places to the right of the decimal. The first value is right ascension, which is read as a time.

For a full example, J1234+5678 translates to as a location 12 hours 32 minutes right ascension, 56.78 degrees north of the ecliptic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulsar#Nomenclature

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_ascension

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