About the Expansion of the Universe

tullio
tullio
Joined: 22 Jan 05
Posts: 1,994
Credit: 31,865,015
RAC: 7,767

RE: I believe its Alan

Message 95142 in response to message 95141

Quote:

I believe its Alan Shepard. The first American in space. And it is Scott Capentar


You're right. Strange how one recalls names from the far past and not from the recent past. I could not name any astronaut on a Shuttle mission.

Rod
Rod
Joined: 3 Jan 06
Posts: 4,396
Credit: 811,266
RAC: 0

RE: RE: I believe its

Message 95143 in response to message 95142

Quote:
Quote:

I believe its Alan Shepard. The first American in space. And it is Scott Capentar

You're right. Strange how one recalls names from the far past and not from the recent past. I could not name any astronaut on a Shuttle mission.

As Chuck Yeager use to call them spam in a can..

There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot. - Aldo Leopold

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
Moderator
Joined: 1 Dec 05
Posts: 6,044
Credit: 106,052,868
RAC: 60,317

Alexei Leonov, first

Alexei Leonov, first spacewalk. The Russian program had alot of firsts :

- first artificial satellite ( Sputnik )
- first living being in orbit ( Leica/Laika the dog, may she rest in peace )
- first man in orbit ( Mr Gargarin )
- first spacewalk

plus Lunakod/Lunokhod, neat remote vehicles which explored the Moon's surface for some months, soil testing and photos, though somewhat overshadowed by Apollo.

I couldn't tell you the name of anyone on the space station, or even how many are up there. Much less what they're up to.

As for time's arrow, I prefer the thermodynamic one - the universe just get messier. There's a weirdo comment just below that article :

Quote:

We cannot neglect fact, one half of Universe evaporates and separates by antigravity (radiation pressure), while the second one agglomerates by gravity. In AWT boundary between insintric and exsintric observational perspective is divided by observer distance scale, which corresponds to wavelength of cosmic microwave background (CMB scale) at 1.73 cm. Above such scale thermodynamic time arrow for material object becomes reversed and driven by gravity. So what we are observing are two thermodynamical processes separated by CMB/human scale into exsintric and insitric perspective.

Material objects, which are large then 1.73 cm tends to agglomerate in their gravity field into larger ones. This is essentially negentropic process, related to inverse time arrow, whereas object smaller then CMB photons are evaporating into radiation, whis is indeed common entropic process. For particles of energy the whole situation remains reciprocal: large photons are dissolving like tachyons in CMB, while smaller one are condensing into solitons, i.e. material particles


which apart from spelling and like errors is utter tripe. Reminds me of a program that was written a while ago for writing philosophy papers - a formulaic approach combining words from a specialised dictionary - some of which were published ( thus making a point about philosophy literature standards ).

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Bikeman (Heinz-Bernd Eggenstein)
Bikeman (Heinz-...
Moderator
Joined: 28 Aug 06
Posts: 3,515
Credit: 433,565,449
RAC: 144,440

RE: Reminds me of a

Message 95145 in response to message 95144

Quote:

Reminds me of a program that was written a while ago for writing philosophy papers - a formulaic approach combining words from a specialised dictionary - some of which were published ( thus making a point about philosophy literature standards ).

Cheers, Mike.

There's a nice generator for Computer Science papers: SCIgen.

CU
Bikeman

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
Moderator
Joined: 1 Dec 05
Posts: 6,044
Credit: 106,052,868
RAC: 60,317

RE: RE: Reminds me of a

Message 95146 in response to message 95145

Quote:
Quote:

Reminds me of a program that was written a while ago for writing philosophy papers - a formulaic approach combining words from a specialised dictionary - some of which were published ( thus making a point about philosophy literature standards ).

Cheers, Mike.

There's a nice generator for Computer Science papers: SCIgen.

CU
Bikeman


Oh, wow!! I just did :

Enabling Access Points and Lambda Calculus with Parure
Yuri Gargarin, Alexei Leonov and Mike Hewson

And it's fully referenced. ROFL!!

Cheers, Mike.

( edit ) Here's a reference :

Quote:
Patterson, D., Hewson, M., Tarjan, R., and Harris, D. W. The impact of stable methodologies on Markov steganography. In Proceedings of ECOOP (Nov. 1994).


I've clearly forgotten some of my earlier work. Those other guys were hacks. I was always carrying them ....

Here's a totally silly graph from it :

ie. bandwidth measured as temperature, some sort of entropic thing maybe, with Big Bang order of magnitude!! Plus complexity as a molecular sized length, nanotech switching hardware perhaps. Evidently low correlation anyway. By the way, parure means 'a set of matching jewellery'. Priceless. :-)

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Rod
Rod
Joined: 3 Jan 06
Posts: 4,396
Credit: 811,266
RAC: 0

RE: Alexei Leonov, first

Message 95147 in response to message 95144

Quote:

Alexei Leonov, first spacewalk. The Russian program had alot of firsts :

- first artificial satellite ( Sputnik )
- first living being in orbit ( Leica/Laika the dog, may she rest in peace )
- first man in orbit ( Mr Gargarin )
- first spacewalk

plus Lunakod/Lunokhod, neat remote vehicles which explored the Moon's surface for some months, soil testing and photos, though somewhat overshadowed by Apollo.

I hope nobody takes this the wrong way:-) But the Russians had better Germans then the Americans had.

There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot. - Aldo Leopold

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
Moderator
Joined: 1 Dec 05
Posts: 6,044
Credit: 106,052,868
RAC: 60,317

RE: I hope nobody takes

Message 95148 in response to message 95147

Quote:
I hope nobody takes this the wrong way:-) But the Russians had better Germans then the Americans had.


Well there was alot of German talent about post war. But there was plenty otherwise. Poor Sergei Korolyov had a rugged time ( denounced for 'slowing research' ) with a Stalin purge. But when freed did a terrific job with their program.

Cheers, Mike.

( edit ) That 'aether wave theory' website also has a blog. Basically it's just two guys who have been wailing on each other for the past couple of months!! Unless one/both of them is a sock puppet ... :-)

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Rod
Rod
Joined: 3 Jan 06
Posts: 4,396
Credit: 811,266
RAC: 0

RE: RE: I hope nobody

Message 95149 in response to message 95148

Quote:
Quote:
I hope nobody takes this the wrong way:-) But the Russians had better Germans then the Americans had.

Well there was alot of German talent about post war. But there was plenty otherwise. Poor Sergei Korolyov had a rugged time ( denounced for 'slowing research' ) with a Stalin purge. But when freed did a terrific job with their program.
/quote]

I apologize I am just recalling some statements from Tom Wolf's book 'The Right Stuff' and the movie which is about the ' Mercury Space Program'. Its is hilarious.

There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot. - Aldo Leopold

Mike Hewson
Mike Hewson
Moderator
Joined: 1 Dec 05
Posts: 6,044
Credit: 106,052,868
RAC: 60,317

RE: I apologize I am just

Message 95150 in response to message 95149

Quote:
I apologize I am just recalling some statements from Tom Wolf's book 'The Right Stuff' and the movie which is about the ' Mercury Space Program'. Its is hilarious.


No need to be sorry! It's a strange business actually. After the USSR fell apart we are now finding out that there was plenty of 'right stuff' about. Alexei Leonov and David Scott have done a great book called 'Two Sides of the Moon'. It's a sort of dual autobiography, but gives a good feel for the cold war setting/background that each astro/cosmo-naut was in. They met in space with the Apollo-Soyuz mission. It's history now, but I can only wonder what could have been done with co-operative rather than competitive programs. The Russians had some very tragic failures only much later openly divulged, like one launch pad debacle that incinerated about 70 people.

As regards the original topic : an often unstated assumption is the constancy of measured values, or more generally the operation of physical laws. Like c, G and h. As humans have been around to do this only 'recently' compared to the age of the universe, then we have a rather narrow time series to base our knowledge. Strictly speaking estimates of the age of the universe ( or even that such a concept is legitimate ) are thinly based. Of course that's our best data for sure, but it pays not to forget that we are extrapolating - predicting beyond the range of the data set that produced our understanding. As I've indicated before, that's the soap we could well be slipping on in the dark energy/matter business.

Cheers, Mike.

I have made this letter longer than usual because I lack the time to make it shorter. Blaise Pascal

Rod
Rod
Joined: 3 Jan 06
Posts: 4,396
Credit: 811,266
RAC: 0

RE: As for time's arrow, I

Message 95151 in response to message 95144

Quote:
As for time's arrow, I prefer the thermodynamic one - the universe just get messier.

I think we prefer the thermodynamic one only because it makes us feel more comfortable. It just fits us in the classical sense. I think we are going see a lot more weirdo theories probably some even peer reviewed (And hear is a cheer for them) before we can come up with experiments to contain this mess we call cosmology.

There are some who can live without wild things and some who cannot. - Aldo Leopold

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.